5 Thanksgiving Foods Your Pet Needs to Avoid

Leave These Foods Off Your Pet’s Holiday Menu

Thanksgiving is a time to give thanks, eat great food and enjoy the company of our family and friends, which often includes our pets. While it’s wonderful to include your pets in your holiday traditions, it’s important to limit the amount and types of food that your pets consume on Thanksgiving. Foods that are fine for humans (and would seem okay for dogs) can actually be very dangerous for your pet.

The following foods should be avoided on Thanksgiving, no bones about it!

  1. 11-25 Thanksgiving Foods Photo 3Turkey Bones
    Turkey bones are small and can become lodged in your dog’s throat, stomach, or intestinal tract. They may also splinter and cause severe damage to the stomach or puncture the small intestine.
  2. Fat Trimmings
    Fatty foods like turkey skin and gravy are difficult for dogs to digest, and consuming turkey skin can result in pancreatitis. Symptoms for this serious disease include vomiting, extreme depression, reluctance to move, and abdominal pain.
  3. Dough/Cake Batter
    Since dough and cake batter contain raw eggs, the first concern for people and pets is salmonella bacteria. What’s more, dough may actually rise in your dog’s belly, which can lead to vomiting, severe abdominal pain, and bloating.
  4. Raisins/Grapes
    Though the causes of their toxicity are unknown, ingesting grapes can cause kidney failure in dogs.
  5. Garlic, Mushrooms, and Onions
    All three of these foods can damage your dog’s internal organs, including kidneys, liver, and the central nervous system. Symptoms can include seizures, coma, vomiting, and possibly death.

 

Photo: BBC News

Photo: BBC News

Keep your vet’s number handy.

Should your pet become ill and show any of the above symptoms, be sure to have your veterinarian’s phone number and the local animal emergency hospital’s number on hand. A quick call to either of them can give you life-saving advice or even help you avoid a trip to the ER. You can reach Boston Veterinary Care at (617) 226-5605.

For a comprehensive list of all foods that dogs should avoid visit: http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/poison-control/people-foods.aspx

5 Thanksgiving Foods Your Pet Needs to Avoid

Photo Credit: Chris Amaral

Thanksgiving is a time to give thanks, eat great food and enjoy the company of our family and friends, which often includes our pets. While it’s wonderful to include your pets in your holiday traditions, it’s important to limit the amount and types of food that your pets consume on Thanksgiving. Foods that are fine for humans (and would seem okay for dogs) can actually be very dangerous for your pet.

The following foods should be avoided on Thanksgiving, no bones about it!

  • Turkey Bones: We’ve grown accustomed to the idea of “giving the dog a bone,” but turkey bones are small and can become lodged in a dog’s throat, stomach or intestinal tract. Additionally, these bones may splinter and cause severe damage to the stomach and could puncture the small intestine. Avoid feeding any turkey bones to your pets!
  • Fat Trimmings: Fatty meat, especially turkey skin may be the tastiest part, but it’s also very dangerous for your pet. Fatty foods like turkey skin and gravy are difficult for dogs to digest and consuming turkey skin can result in pancreatitis. Symptoms for this serious disease include vomiting, extreme depression, reluctance to move and abdominal pain.
  • Dough/Cake Batter: Do you remember your mother telling you not to eat the cookie dough? If you shouldn’t be eating it, neither should your pet. Since dough and cake batter contain raw eggs, the first concern is salmonella bacteria. The second concern is that the dough may actually rise in your dog’s belly (sound weird, but it’s possible). This can lead to vomiting, severe abdominal pain and bloating.
  • Raisins/Grapes: Grapes commonly make the list of foods dogs should avoid, but we like to remind people that they are very dangerous. Though the causes of their toxicity are unknown, we do know that they can cause kidney failure.
  • Mushrooms: Good for you, not for your dog. Mushrooms can damage your dog’s internal organs, including kidneys, liver and the central nervous system. If your dog does eat mushrooms, you can expect the following symptoms: seizures, coma, vomiting and possibly death.

Keep your vets number handy.

Should your pet become ill and show any of the above symptoms, be sure to have your veterinarian’s phone number and the local animal emergency hospital’s number on hand. A quick call to either of them can give you life-saving advice or even help you avoid a trip to the ER. You can reach Boston Veterinary Care at (617) 226-5605.

For a comprehensive list of all foods that dogs should avoid visit: http://www.aspca.org/pet-care/poison-control/people-foods.aspx

SAVE THE DATE – NOV. 27 IS GIVING TUESDAY

Pledge to give back to the pet in your life!

The Animal Rescue League of Boston has joined with #GivingTuesday, a first of its kind effort that will harness the collective power of a unique blend of partners—charities, families, businesses and individuals—to transform how people think about, talk about and participate in the giving season. Coinciding with the Thanksgiving Holiday and the kickoff of the holiday shopping season, #GivingTuesday will inspire people to take collaborative action to improve their local communities, give back in better, smarter ways to the charities and causes they support and help create a better world. Taking place November 27,2012 – the Tuesday after Thanksgiving – #GivingTuesday will create a national moment around the holidays dedicated to giving, similar to how Black Friday and Cyber Monday have become days that are, today, synonymous with holiday shopping.

Animals share their unconditional love with us every day. Will you show how much you appreciate them on Giving Tuesday?

The League is asking that you give back to animals in one of two ways this holiday season:

1) Take a pledge to spend 10 extra minutes with your pet each day starting on Nov 27. This may mean waking up 10 minutes early and playing with your cat before leaving for work, extending your dog’s walk by 10 minutes, or letting your rabbit out of his hutch for 10 minutes more than usual. Tweet us your pledge today! twitter.com/arlboston

2) Donate to help animals that are less fortunate this holiday season. You can do this by purchasing an ornament for your pet for our Holiday Tree or by giving directly to the League at www.arlboston.org/donate

We hope that you’ll take a moment this holiday season to give to animals. When you’re out doing your holiday shopping on Black Friday try to remember to set a few dollars aside for animals in need. To learn about the League’s participation in Giving Tuesday click here.