Today! Pet-Friendly Spring Event at BVC

Pet Photos with the Easter Bunny!

FIVER will be at BVC's event this afternoon.

FIVER  is one of the bunnies who’ll be at the event. His adoption fee has been waived thanks to a generous sponsor.

Please join Boston Veterinary Care for a special Easter event celebrating their dedicated clients and welcoming new faces.

Bring the whole family (pets too) today, Saturday, April 12 from noon-3pm for photos with the Easter Bunny, refreshments, and Easter egg hunt and YES live, adoptable bunnies from the ARL!

Learn more at bostonvetcare.com

Special thank you to the Berkeley Perk Cafe for donating refreshments for the event!

 

Enjoy 20% Off Pet Dental Services at BVC

We’ll Have Your Pet Smiling In No Time

In honor of Pet Dental Health Month, Boston Veterinary Care (BVC) will offer 20% off pet dental cleanings booked during the month of February!

Did you know that, if left untreated, dental disease can lead to serious health concerns ranging from tooth loss to bacterial infection of the heart, liver and kidneys?

Or that 80% of dogs over the age of 3 and at least 50% of cats have advanced periodontal disease that requires immediate professional treatment?[1]

We encourage you to have your pet’s teeth examined by one of the skilled veterinarians at BVC.   Remember: you get 20% off dental-related products and services booked this month!

Call 617-226-5605 to schedule an appointment for your pet today!

EvenCatsWantPearlyWhitesDentalHealthAD


[1] Wiggs RB, Lobprise HB. Periontontology. In: Veterinary Dentistry. Principles and Practice. Philadelphia, PA: Lippin-Raven, 1997:186-231

 

Pet Photos with Santa Today!

All Proceeds Benefit the ARL

Come in from the cold and join Boston Veterinary Care today from 1-3PM to have your pet’s photo taken with Santa! Hot cider and treats for both pets and humans alike will be provided. All proceeds benefit the Animal Rescue League of Boston.

Donate to a good cause, enjoy some refreshments and have a lasting keepsake of your furry family member – a photo with Santa! Check out the event on Facebook! Your donation will help shelter pets find a ‘Home For The Holidays’!

Please be sure that cats and small pets are in a suitable carrier for their safety.

Thank you in advance for your contribution!

We hope to see you there!

 

 

Thank You to Our Veterinary Technicians

National Veterinary Technicians Week: October 13-19

Veterinary technicians are an essential part of the work done at the Animal Rescue League of Boston.  They work in our shelters, on the Spay Waggin‘ and at Boston Veterinary Care.  As advocates for pet health, veterinary technicians assist veterinarians in providing care to the animals in our care.  The National Veterinary Technician Association has declared Oct 13 to 19 National Vet Tech Week.  The ARL applauds the message from NVTA, “Lifelong Commitment. Lifelong Care.”  as it echos our own sentiment for pet ownership.

We are proud of the work our vet techs do so professionally, and we are grateful that they have chosen to work at the Animal Rescue League of Boston.

The one and only Jessica, who is

Jessica is our vet tech extraordinaire at the Boston shelter!

Although we value our vet techs (listed below) every day of the year, we take this week to especially honor them for their commitment to compassionate, high-quality veterinary care for all animals! Thank you for all that you do!

Boston Veterinary Care
Sasha M.
Victor V.
Olivia L.
Sue M.

Spay Waggin’/Shelter Medicine
Andrea G.
Bonnie M.
Jean M.
Jessica W.

Be sure to let your veterinary technician know how much you appreciate him/her next time you’re at the vet with your pet!

 

Calling All Vet Technicians

Boston Veterinary Care is Currently Hiring a Veterinary Technician

07-06 BVC VetTech ThumbWe are seeking an experienced technician who is certified and/or has at least two years of experience in a small veterinary practice. This position is key to Boston Veterinary Care’s operations because it involves every aspect of the Clinic.

A high level of professionalism and strong customer service skills are mandatory.  Working in a small busy environment make strong interpersonal skills and a willingness to be a team player absolute requirements.  This position has to be flexible in the duties and responsibilities to best fit the changing needs of the Boston Veterinary Care and the mission of the Animal Rescue League of Boston.  The duties of the position cover any part of the veterinary practice and does not include diagnosis, prescription or surgery.  The duties do not entail any activities prohibited by the veterinary practice act of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.  The technician performs all functions under the supervision of a licensed veterinarian.

If you’re looking for a fun, yet challenging work environment with some amazing veterinarians, consider applying!

For more information about this position or to apply please visit the careers section of our website.

Looking for Quality Healthcare for Your Pet in Boston?

Dr.MeklerSendableBOSTON VETERINARY CARE is currently accepting new clients! If you’re looking for a quality vet clinic with friendly staff you should visit Boston Veterinary Care at the Animal Rescue League of Boston. The BVC team of highly-skilled and dedicated veterinarians and technicians share invaluable experience in treating animals with challenging medical conditions. They pride themselves in serving primary care for privately owned pets.

They offer the following services:

  • Preventative Medicine
  • Wellness Vaccines
  • Feline/Canine Nutrition Counseling
  • Digital Dental Radiography
  • Dentistry
  • Outpatient Surgery
  • Orthopedic Surgery

Most importantly, when you bring your pet to Boston Veterinary Care you are supporting the League’s mission to rescue domesticated animals and wildlife from suffering, cruelty, abandonment and neglect!

To make an appointment, call 617.226.5605 or email bvc@arlboston.org.

Hours of operation:
Monday – Wednesday – 8am to 7pm
Thursday – Saturday – 8am to 4pm
Sunday – Closed

BVC also offers free on-site parking!

Ask The Vet: Our Vets Answer Your Questions Part II

Danielle d.W.: We just had a terrible scare with our dog and the disease HGE! I had never heard of this before and I think it would be great to let people know how serious, but treatable this is!

Answer: BVC Relief Veterinarian Dr. Vo explains Hemorrhagic Gastroenteritis (HGE) as an acute condition that leads to inflammation and bleeding of the intestines. This disease can also cause systemic infection, this means  that bacteria can be absorbed into the body. Dr. Vo tells us that HGE presents with bloody diarrhea and vomiting. When this illness is present the stool is described as “raspberry jam.”  When diagnosed by a veterinarian the treatment includes, hospitalization with fluids and pain management. Depending on the cause of the disease it may be treated by antibiotics as well. Symptoms of this illness can be severe and even fatal if not treated. Causes are still unknown, but may be due to abnormal reactions to food, bacteria or drugs. Dr. Vo reminds us that many other diseases can cause similar symptoms. If your dog suddenly displays bloody diarrhea you should seek medical attention immediately.

Erin: My 4-year old male cat (8.5 lbs) with a formally small appetite is suddenly, over the past few months, seemingly starving about an hour after eating and bugs me for the rest of the night. He also wakes me up in the morning now wanting food (which he never did, that was left to my other (fat) cat). I took him to the vet and they did a fecal and found nothing wrong, or no physical symptoms like weight loss, etc…is it worth getting blood work? They didn’t’ think so, unless his weight changes.

Answer: Dr. Vo explains that changes in dietary habits can be caused by both medical and behavioral issues. Endocrine problems, parasites and intestinal disease are some common medical causes of these symptoms.  At 4 years old it would be rare for a cat to have hyperthyroidism. Blood work can indicate other issues and it is never a bad idea to check because doing this will also help in ruling out certain medical problems. Dr. Vo notes that if behavior is the cause of her increasing food demands, then it may be helpful to evaluate her environment and your own behavior to see if you may be enabling these changes. To learn more check out http://indoorpet.osu.edu/. Here you can find tips to help you identify sources of un-wanted behavior.

Have a question for one of our Boston Veterinary Care vets? Leave your questions in our comments section below!

New Year’s Resolutions for Pet Owners

NYRBlogPhotoSo you’ve made a New Year’s Resolution for yourself, but have you thought about making a resolution specific to your pet? Here are 7 resolutions for pet lovers for 2013, because our four-legged companions always deserve a little more love! Take a minute to read through these and tell us which one you’re choosing for your New Year’s Resolution.

  1. Spend more time with your pet. Your cat or dog wants to be with you! After you’ve been at work all day, they can’t wait to see you! Pledge to spend an extra ten minutes with your pet every day. Get up ten minutes early and play with your cat or extend your dog’s walk by 10 more minutes or just take a few extra minutes to snuggle with your pup and scratch him behind the ear when you get home from work.
  2. Microchip your pet. We strongly recommend micro-chipping your pet. A microchip is an electronic device placed under the skin of an animal. The chips are about the size of a grain of rice and emit a low-frequency radio wave when detected by a special scanner. Pet microchips aren’t a tracking or GPS device but simply a way of storing a pet owner’s address and phone number if the pet is lost. For more information about pet microchips contact your vet, local animal shelter or Animal Control Officer. HomeAgain, a microchip and pet recovery service, is responsible for reuniting more than 1,000,000 lost pets with their owners. 
  3. Bring your pet to the vet.  The League‘s very own Dr. Martha Smith-Blackmore, DVM says “a checkup with your veterinarian can help you determine how healthy your dog is…. even healthy looking dogs can have hidden problems.” Take your pet to the vet at least once a year to keep vaccinations current, get heart-worm prevention renewed and make sure your pet is healthy.
  4. Take better care of your pet’s teeth. Dental Disease affects dogs and cats, just as it does humans. There are several ways to prevent dental disease in your pets. Give them treats that clean teeth. Brush their teeth on a regular basis, if you can’t use a toothbrush, use your finger and apply special toothpaste as suggested by your vet. If tartar buildup occurs, your pet’s teeth should be professionally cleaned by your veterinarian.
  5. Give your pet the proper nutrition. Poor nutrition can lead to poor health. There are many great dog food brands out there. Tell your vet what type of food you’re looking for, holistic, organic, all-natural, dental, weight control, etc… and ask your vet what brands s/he would recommend. An unbalanced diet can result in poor skin, hair coat, muscle tone, and obesity.
  6. DT_mini2Put an end to your pet’s behavioral problems. If your dog is misbehaving or if you want to teach him basic commands, enroll him in a dog training class. Dog training classes start at our Boston Headquarters on January 5. We offer a 10% discount to BVC clients and a 50% discount to ARL Alums!
  7. Allow your pet more opportunities to exercise. Most animals like to play, so find an activity that you both enjoy and go for it. Exercise is good for your pet and you! If your dog likes to run, try jogging a few times a week. If your dog likes to play fetch take him to the park and throw a ball around. For cats, try finding a toy that they like to chase.

Food Is Not Love

BigCatOne of the biggest issues with animal obesity is that owners themselves simply don’t recognize it. After all, our pets are our best friends; we see them every day, so naturally a few extra pounds can easily go unnoticed. This is until of course the dreaded weigh in at the Doctors office. When it comes to our pets being over weight there is much more at stake than just good looks. Some of the many health risks resulting from pet obesity include diabetes, joint stress, arthritis, blood pressure issues, heart disease and most importantly, longevity. Maintaining our pets everyday quality of life in later years becomes much more difficult when they are overweight. Obesity in our animals is not only important to recognize, but to control and prevent.

So how can we really tell if our pets are over weight? As DVM Kasja Newlin puts it, when feeling over our dogs ribs it should feel similar to the way our knuckles do when our hand is laid out flat. On the contrary, if your pets ribs feel the same way your knuckles do when forming a fist then they are under-weight. An easier way to tell might be simply standing over your pet, when looking down at them you should be able to see a waist. If you see a tank, your pet is too heavy. Keep track of your pets weight just as you would your own, this way any gains or losses can be easily detected. It is important for pet owners to understand that though your pet being a few pounds over weight may not sound like very much to you, it is to them. In our defense, our pets constant eagerness to eat is easily confused for actual hunger. As DVM Dr. Davis likes to remind us, the important truth is that our pets are a lot like us, we eat because we like to and not necessarily because we are hungry.

If your Veterinarian has advised you that your pet is over weight, or under weight, it’s important to take control of the issue. We don’t want to see rapid weight gain or weight loss in any pet so it is important to cut back or add on to equate the ideal calorie intake. Proper calorie intake varies between each animal. Consult your veterinarian to learn your pets ideal weight.  With your pet’s Doctor you can calculate a proper diet in accordance with the recommended calorie intake. After all, we want to see our loyal companions live forever, so lets start feeding them that way!