Unite in the Fight Against Rabies

On 28th September every year, the world unites in the fight against rabies.

World Rabies Day is a day of activism and awareness. It’s an opportunity to for you to join the global movement to put an end to suffering rabies causes by organizing or taking part in a World Rabies Day event.

world-rabies-day-logoRabies is a viral disease that can affect all mammals, including humans. The virus attacks the central nervous system and can be secreted in saliva. Infected animals show no fear of humans, drool and act in an agitated fashion.

In Massachusetts, outdoor cats are the “bridge” species, who are most likely to encounter a rabid animal, become exposed to rabies and bring it home.  The most common rabid animal is the bat, and bats can come into your home.  For this reason, all dogs, cats and ferrets, whether indoor only or not, are mandated by law to be vaccinated against rabies.

Every dog, cat and ferret adopted from the Animal Rescue League of Boston is vaccinated against rabies. Every dog or cat that we spay or neuter on the Spay Waggin’ or at our Fix A Feral clinics is vaccinated against rabies. We offer rabies clinics in the spring in Boston, Dedham and Brewster to help provide easy access to rabies vaccination.  We are doing our part to help prevent the spread of rabies in Massachusetts.   Please do your part and make sure your pets are vaccinated!

If your cat is not vaccinated against rabies, make an appointment for a vet exam at Boston Spay/Neuter Day for Cats on Thursday, October 2. For just $10 an Animal Rescue League of Boston veterinarian will be on-site to see your cat and your cat can receive a vet exam, vaccinations (including rabies vaccine), flea treatment and a microchip. Boston Spay/Neuter Day is sponsored by the Massachusetts Animal Coalition License Plate Fund.

More about Boston Spay/Neuter Day: http://bit.ly/spaybos

 

Deaf Dog Wiggles Her Way into Staff Member’s Heart

Bringing Awareness to Special Needs Pets

Here at the Animal Rescue League our staff have all sorts of pets and among them is a deaf dog named Tippy. What better time to share her story with you than during Deaf Pet Awareness Week? Read on to learn about Tippy.

Tippy1

Tippy

A little over 8 years ago, Maryann Regan, director of shelter operations at the ARL, was managing the animal intake office of our Boston adoption center when a local animal control officer brought in an extremely wiggly and happy white dog.

The officer explained that the municipal shelter had no room and wanted to know if we had kennel space to house this stray dog. “Almost the moment the officer handed the leash over to me,” says Maryann, “this dog was tugging at my heart strings.  She immediately began to give me kisses and her wiggles were out of control- she seemed like a very happy, sweet girl!”

Maryann found herself spending extra time with her, –going for long walks, giving her extra play time in the play yard, and sharing a few extra treats. Something told her that this dog was meant for her family.

“I introduced her to my husband and it was love at first site. We decided, after her medical exam and behavior evaluation, we would adopt her as long as she and the other family members got along.  The other family members are two senior cats that also have a very special place in our hearts.”

During her behavior evaluation, the wiggly white dog performed true to form–high energy, playful, happy, and sweet!

As affectionate and people-oriented as she behaved, however, she also tended to ignore us when we called for her.

Maryann explains: “It wasn’t consistent with what she was typically displaying in her personality because she was usually very concerned or interested in being near every person she met.  She loved people!  Then, why was she ignoring us?”

The pre-adoption medical evaluation identified the issue: this dog was deaf.

“It’s not uncommon for white animals to be deaf.  This dog was all white, with the exception of a few, adorable black dots here and there bounced around on her body,” says Maryann.  “All the times we called for her attention that she did not respond to was not her ignoring us, she simply couldn’t hear us.”

Neither Maryann or her husband had experience with a deaf dog, but Maryann felt confident that they could educate themselves on how to handle her appropriately.  “I had such a strong bond with this dog, I had no reservations about doing all the homework necessary to make this a successful adoption for us, the cats and for her.”

So, if you’re considering adding a pet to your family, don’t overlook deaf pets in your search.

To learn more about Deaf Pet Awareness Week visit trupanion.com/deaf-pets.

09-24-14 trupanion deaf pets

 

Wally the Cat Recovering from Serious Injuries

Beloved cat survives a perilous walk on prison wall

Last week, the Animal Rescue League of Boston received a call about Wally, a fluffy gray and white cat badly injured during a dangerous walk along the razor wire that lines the top of the wall at Bridgewater State Prison.

09-15-14 Wally PicWally’s mom had given birth to him and his siblings about two years ago outside the prison, and continued to live in the vicinity as her family grew up.  Prisoners and guards had kindly fed and cared for the cats ever since.

The very friendly and sweet Wally had endeared himself to his caregivers who watched him grow from a rambunctious kitten into a particularly curious cat.

No one is quite sure how he did it, but Wally managed to climb 30-40 feet up the prison wall and gotten himself stuck.

For two days he walked along the razor wire line, becoming more frantic as staff, the fire department, and animal control officers from Bridgewater and Halifax tried to rescue him.  The frightened cat injured himself very seriously in the process, cutting himself repeatedly all over his body on the sharp, jagged wire barbs.

A determined prison maintenance worker finally cornered Wally along the wall, threw a blanket over him, and – to echoing cheers from guards and prisoners alike – brought him down to Lisa McKay, the animal control officer in Bridgewater.  She immediately brought Wally to New England Animal Medical Center where veterinarians determined he needed over $3,000 in surgery to repair the damage from his wounds.

Desperate to find an organization willing to cover Wally’s medical costs, help him recuperate, and ultimately find him a new home, McKay called the ARL.

The ARL answered “yes” to the call for help!

Wally sadly lost his tail to his injuries, but thankfully surgeons mended the deep cuts in his back leg and above his eye.  He is now recovering in the care of a dedicated foster volunteer and will eventually come to the ARL when he is ready for adoption.

Very importantly, Wally will survive.  The kindness, compassion, and love so many have shown him will continue to carry him through.

Would you like to help Wally and other animals like him?

Only with your support can animals like Wally get emergency medical assistance when they need it most.

Please visit arlboston/kintera.org/wally or click the button below to make a donation to help pay for the care and treatment of Wally and other animals like him.

Donate Now

 

Back to School for People AND Pups

Register for Fall Dog training Classes at ARL

Back to school isn’t just for kids! The fall is a great time to get you and your pup involved in dog training. As you figure out your fall schedule, be sure to save some time for enriching your dog’s life.

Why send your dog to school? Training your dog benefits him, your family, and everyone around you. Not only does it teach your pup rules and good manners, it also keeps him from getting bored.

Pets can become bored when left alone all day while the family’s at work and school. In a survey, Pet360 discovered that 20 percent of pet owners with school-age children said their pets showed signs of anxiety when everyone in the house went back to their normal routine at the end of the summer. Dog training classes are a fantastic way to bond with your pup and create a fun, challenging routine that will keep your pet active.

The Animal Rescue League offers a variety of dog training classes as part of our commitment to supporting positive relationships between people and their pets.

09-08-14 Dog Training PhotoOur certified, experienced and caring dog trainers help you teach your dog basic and advanced commands, as well as house and outdoor manners.  We also offer fun dog sports and agility classes if you’re looking for something more laid back.

All classes are held at our Boston shelter and we offer free on-site parking for your convenience.

Here are a few of our classes that start soon.

  • Puppy Kindergarten: Tuesdays September 09 at 6pm and Sunday September 28 at 10am
  • Good Manners: Tuesday, September 09 at 7pm and Sunday, September 28 at 11am
  • Advanced Puppy Training: Sunday, September 28 at 9am
  • Sniffing for Fun: Sunday, September 28 at 12pm
  • Canine Good Citizen: Sunday, September 28 at 1pm

Recent ARL alums receive a 25% discount. Boston Veterinary Care clients receive a 10% discount.

For more information and to enroll in a dog training class visit arlboston.org/dog-training.

 

Super Pets Are Here!

So many reasons to adopt from the Animal Rescue League of Boston

PringleBringing an animal into your home and making them a part of your family is a very special event indeed. In fact, some of the happiest work we do at the Animal Rescue League of Boston is helping you find a super pet!

The ARL finds homes for about 3,000 animals every year, including cats, dogs, birds, bunnies, ferrets, cows, sheep, horses, snakes, and lizards. We take in animals from a variety of circumstances, but a large portion are responsibly surrendered to us because of “people-related” reasons—their owners were moving, had no time because of a job or life change, or suddenly became sick or financially unable to care for their pets.

Animals like Pringle (pictured upper right), Cupid (pictured middle right), and Peach and Rosalina (pictured bottom center), all have big hearts with lots of love, loyalty, and good company to give to human companions—day and night!

When you adopt from a shelter, you’ll feel good about giving an animal a chance at a better life. And not just one animal – when you take your new pet home with you, the ARL can take in another at one of our shelters.

cupidIn addition to those fantastic feelings of helping a fellow living thing in need, you can also rest assured that, before they go to a new home, every adoptable animal at the ARL receives:

  • Spay/neuter services
  • Health screening and veterinary examination
  • Behavior screening and evaluations
  • Vaccinations
  • Flea, tick and mite treatment
  • Feline Leukemia test for cats/Heartworm test and preventive medication for dogs
  • Microchip identification and registration

With the help of the dedicated staff at our animal shelters in Boston, Brewster, and Dedham, you can learn more about whether a particular animal you meet at our shelter is a good pet-match for you before you bring them home.

Search adoptable animals at our shelters

Already adopted a super pet from the ARL or another animal rescue group?  We want to hear from you!

Post a picture and share the story of your super rescue pet on Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram with #ARLSuperpets. Once a week, we’ll pick a winner from all the entries to receive a super pet prize.

Every picture and story you share helps spread the word about just how super rescue pets can be.

Stay tuned for more super pets stories, news, and pets of the week this summer!

peach & rosalina

 

 

Vote for the ARL and BVC on Boston A-List

Animal Rescue League & Boston Veterinary Care are Boston A-List Nominees

As the defending champions of last year’s “BEST Local Charity” award on the Boston A-List, we’re asking you to vote for us and tell your friends to do the same!

The Boston A-List is a contest featuring more than 4,712 local businesses competing to be named best. YOUR votes determine the outcome. If you are passionate about the Animal Rescue League and the work that we do, please cast your vote. Voting ends Friday, August 1st. 

Vote for ARL Now

Additionally, Boston Veterinary Care is a contender for “BEST Veterinarian,” so if you’re a BVC client and you love your vet, or if you love that BVC helps our shelter pets please vote for them.

Vote for BVC Now

Please help the Animal Rescue League and Boston Veterinary Care take first place on the Boston A-List today! Thank you for your support.

boston a-list logo

 

Change Underway at BAC Shelter Facility

Mayor Walsh taking action, ARL supporting efforts

Camilla upon arriving at the ARL.

Camilla seen here soon after arriving at the ARL’s Boston shelter.

As reported in the Boston Globe this morning, Mayor Walsh is taking action to address the situation at the Boston Animal Control (BAC) shelter facility in Roslindale.

At the end of June, the ARL visited the BAC facility to meet four dogs connected to a law enforcement case that had just concluded. We hoped to help the dogs find new homes now that the case was over.

When our staff arrived, one of the dogs from the case, Camilla (pictured right), appeared very emaciated with sores on her body. Her condition and other observations made by our staff while at the facility raised so many concerns, we brought them to the immediate attention of Mayor Walsh.

Camilla, seen here after her first bath at our Boston shelter, has become a staff-favorite.

Camilla, seen here after her first bath at our Boston shelter, has become a staff-favorite.

We have continued to support the Mayor’s efforts to help the animals currently at the BAC facility and evaluate all areas of the shelter’s operations.

The ARL has taken in 35 animals from the BAC facility at our shelters in Boston and Dedham.  At the Mayor’s request, a team of ARL veterinarians and shelter operations staff also did a comprehensive on-site assessment. We plan to provide a full report of findings to the Mayor next week.

Thanks to Mayor Walsh and the supporting efforts of our colleagues, we truly believe a change is underway at the BAC facility—a change which will have an immediate positive effect for the animals there now and for many years to come.

hanks to proper care, nutrition, and extra attention, Camilla has gained 9 pounds.

Thanks to proper care, nutrition, and extra attention, Camilla has already gained 9 pounds.

Everyone at the ARL is honored to be part of making a difference for animals and the City of Boston today.

 

 

Meet Madeline!

Sweet survivor cat ready for her new home

“Cases like hers are the reason that many of us got into the business of rescuing animals: there is nothing more rewarding than seeing an animal that was previously neglected transform with some TLC.”
– Dr. Kate Gollon, shelter veterinarian at the Animal Rescue League of Boston

Mad Before&AfterAlmost two months ago, a very kind person brought Madeline to our Dedham shelter after discovering the 8-year-old cat unable to move in the backyard of her home where someone had left her. Shelter staff instantly observed the fur on Madeline’s hind quarters appeared thickly matted and that she couldn’t move her back legs.

Her sweet temperament and soft, steady purr touched the hearts of shelter veterinarian Dr. Kate Gollon and all the Dedham staff as they worked to make her comfortable with pain medications and by shaving off the mass of tangles on her lower body.

Dr. Gollon determined Madeline had nearly 4 inches of mats over 70% of her body.  The bag of her shaved matted fur tipped the scales at over a pound.  The twisted condition of her coat  had clearly forced her to go to the bathroom on herself and likely prevented her from walking for some time. Even after shelter staff shaved her fur, she couldn’t walk on her very weak back legs.

When diagnostic tests including x-rays and bloodwork did not provide a more definitive reason for the weakness in her back legs, Dr. Gollon prescribed a regimen of daily physical therapy to help Madeline recover her strength and mobility. Staff gave Madeline time post-shave to recuperate and get to know them before carefully and caringly beginning to work with her to get her walking.

At first, staff gently moved her back legs for her, three times a day. Gradually, they helped her stand by placing her in a sling to support her weight while getting her up on all fours. Once her ability to support herself improved, staff worked with her on walking across the floor and maneuvering changes in elevation.  To give her some added traction on the polished cement floors at the shelter, staff would place a touch of Vaseline on her paw pads.

Everyone at the Dedham shelter felt as proud as mamma cats watching Madeline’s amazing progress as she confidently strolled to them and maneuvered up carpeted steps for the first time!

A dedicated ARL foster volunteer brought Madeline to her home to help her re-acclimate to living with people. Though the determined kitty remains a bit unsteady on her hind legs, she shows no signs they are holding her back. According to her foster mom, Madeline loves to explore and happily curls up on the couch for a good snooze afterwards.

We’re very happy to report Madeline is ready for adoption!  Scotties Facial Tissue will cover her adoption fee this weekend, so come visit the ARL’s Dedham shelter and read her adoption profile to learn more about her.

Because of her unsteady legs, she would do best in a home with carpet.  A one-story house or apartment, or a home where she would spend most of her time in one big room or have access to her litter box and food without having to climb stairs would make for the ideal situation for Madeline.

In the words of Dr. Gollon: “Madeline is a special cat and quite a survivor!  The family who adopts her will most definitely fall in love with her as much as we have at ARL.”

 

Happy Pride Day! Boston Shelter Closed Today

Boston Shelter Closed 6/14

Pride ShepherdHappy Boston Pride Day! The Animal Rescue League of Boston will be marching in this year’s Boston Pride Day parade. We hope to see some friendly faces cheering us on along the route. The parade starts at 11am. See you there!

Also, please note that our Boston shelter will be closed today, Saturday, June 14. We apologize for any inconvenience.

 

Meet Rugby!

A real miracle puppy ready to find a new home

“Rugby’s story highlights all the wonderful people in the ARL network who are dedicated to helping neglected animals.”
- Dr. Edward Schettino, Director of Veterinary Medical Services, ARL

When we first met Rugby back in April, he could have been the poster child for our “See Something, Say Something: Report Animal Cruelty,” campaign running that month.

At the time, he was 4 1/2 months old and had been cruelly abandoned in the middle of the road in Fitchburg, Massachusetts.  His front legs were severely twisted at the wrists, so Rugby could only get around by doing a haphazard crawl.  Thankfully, someone reported spotting Rugby inching his way along the road where he’d been left, and Lt. Alan Borgal, director of the ARL’s Center for Animal Protection, brought him to the ARL’s Boston Shelter.

When Dr. Edward Schettino, the ARL’s director of veterinary medical services, examined Rugby at the shelter, he observed the spirited young dog was very underweight.  Dr. Schettino concluded the condition of Rugby’s front legs was probably due to poor nutrition and long-term confinement to a very small crate.  After reviewing x-rays of Rugby’s front legs with his colleagues, Dr. Schettino preliminarily diagnosed Rugby with bilateral carpal laxity syndrome, a condition that could require surgery or could also respond to a diet of well-balanced adult dog-food and a program of rigorous exercise.

Rugby Licking His NoseRigorous exercise seemed to be the best course of treatment for Rugby!  A rambunctious dog, Rugby already had ARL behaviorists, staff,  and trained volunteers working with him to help him channel his energies into playing with other dogs and chew toys.

And getting him moving helped on the medical and behavioral front indeed!

Within a few weeks, Rugby’s front legs were improving.  The ARL collaborated on his treatment with colleagues at the ARL and Tufts University Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine.  To increase strength in his legs, Rugby began underwater treadmill therapy twice a week, under the supervision of the ARL’s Dr. Alett Mekler and the physical therapists at Animotion in Stoughton, Massachusetts, who donated their time and services.

Watch more videos of Rugby.

06-10-14 Rugby & Schettino PicIn just under three months, Rugby has come incredibly far in his rehabilitation.  He is moving well on his front legs and his sweet, playful personality makes everyone at the shelter smile–even when he’s a bit of a handful (written with love and a smile, of course).

Thanks to the collaborative effort of our Center for Animal Protection, shelter veterinarians, dog behaviorists, shelter staff, volunteers, Tufts University Cummings School, and Animotion, this miracle puppy is now ready for a new home!

According to shelter staff, an experienced dog owner preferably with another dog would be the best situation for Rugby–the guy really needs a playmate to keep him on his toes and moving!  He’s still working on his jumpy/mouthy behavior, so an active household with older children would be more suited to his big personality and energy-level.

View Rugby’s adoption profile.

Stay tuned for further updates about his progress!