Animal Rescue League of Boston Rescues Dozens of Sick Birds

Animal owners in the Dorchester Neighborhood notified to be cautious while walking their dogs

Dorchester birds

Today, the ARL will send 15 birds to Tufts Wildlife Center in Grafton, MA for additional treatment.

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) responded to 33 Bakersfield Street in Dorchester, MA on September 8, 2016  in response to a resident who called regarding her sick cat and the observation of birds falling from trees.

The ARL immediately gave emergency treatment to one cat, but unfortunately the cat could not be saved.

Additionally, 47 Grackle-type birds were either falling to the ground, sick, thrashing and unable to fly, or were found unresponsive.

It was determined that the birds should be isolated and neighbors notified to keep dogs and other animals from the area.

Current update on the 47 Grackles:

  • 12 birds found deceased on scene
  • 8 birds passed away shortly after rescue on their way to the shelter
  • 12 birds were humanely euthanized due to their poor condition
  • 15 birds remain in good condition in the custody of the Animal Rescue League of Boston Veterinary Team. Today, these animals will be sent to Tufts Wildlife Center in Grafton, MA.

The ARL continues to work with the State Department of Agriculture, the Massachusetts Department of Public Health, City of Boston Inspectional Services Department, and Boston Public Health Commission to determine the cause of this unusual incident.

DONATE NOW to ensure that animals in need, like the many Grackles involved in this case, receive the critical veterinary care that they need.

 

Over 170,000 Signatures Collected to STOP Farm Animal Cruelty

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) hosts rally to celebrate successful signature campaign

We’re thrilled to be a part of the Citizens for Farm Animal Protection campaign, where over 170,000 signatures have been collected to phase out the extreme confinement of animals at industrial-style factory farms, as well as the sale of products produced under those conditions. Last week, fifteen boxes containing the #StopCrueltyMA signatures made their way to the Secretary of the Commonwealth for certification and to secure a spot on the November ballot.

Interested in lending a hand? Learn how you can help at Citizensforfarmanimals.com/help

CFFAP_TurnIn-1681

SPECIAL THANKS…to all of the wonderful organizations involved including the HSUS, ASPCA, MSPCA Animal Action Team, Franklin Park Zoo, The Humane League – Boston, Mercy For Animals, Farm Forward, Compassion in World Farming (USA), Animal Equality, Farm Sanctuary, the Mass Sierra Club and all of the dedicated volunteers who collected signatures and to all those who supported this momentous effort to end the extreme confinement of farm animals!

 

 

Breaking News: Severely Matted Dog Rescued in Westport, MA

ARL & Westport Police Seeking Public’s Help with Information

DO YOU RECOGNIZE THIS DOG? Contact the Westport Police Department at  (508) 636-1122 or the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s Law Enforcement Department at (617) 226-5610.

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) and the Westport Police Department need the public’s assistance with information about a severely matted dog found roaming the area of Sanford Road and Milk Avenue in Westport, Massachusetts on Sunday, June 5.

Watch Jersey’s story, as reported by Fox 25.

matted dog

Severely matted dog “Jersey” was found wandering the area of Sanford Road and Milk Avenue on Sunday, June 5.

The ARL was called to assist local authorities with the care and investigation of the animal. The severely matted dog, now known as “Jersey”, had no collar, markings or identification. She is estimated to be an 8-year-old female Brussels Griffin mix. Scroll to the bottom to watch her video.  

Jersey is in severe condition and will undergo enucleation surgery on Friday, June 10, rendering her permanently blind. She will also have bladder stones removed and some significant dental treatments.

She is being cared for at the ARL’s Boston shelter. Jersey’s extensive medical treatments will cost between $3,000-$4,000.

While there may be many circumstances that led to the animal being lost or abandoned, the Westport Police is seeking any information that helps to find her owner(s) or other individuals that have a connection to this animal.

The public is encouraged to contact the Westport Police Department directly at (508) 636-1122 or the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s Law Enforcement Department at (617) 226-5610.

 

Support the ARL Boston Marathon Runners

After months of training through winter weather, our runners are ready to take on 26.2 for animals in need!

Boston Marathon sponsor JH

Thank you to Boston Marathon sponsor John Hancock for including the ARL in the 2016 charity bib program!

You can show your support for the ARL’s Boston Marathon Team

1. Donating to the team to help them reach their goal of $35,000 by visiting https://www.crowdrise.com/ARLBoston2016

2. Tracking their race progress at using their bib numbers at  http://bit.ly/1NcYdDm

Andrea 30899
Jillian 30776
Alexis 30967
Marco 30814

3. Joining us in Coolidge Corner near Marion Street to cheer for our runners at they near the finish line

A VERY SPECIAL THANKS to the dedicated runners on our 2016 Boston Marathon team!

 

Spring Cat Food Drive for Boston’s Homeless Cats

Start spring off on the right paw by giving to animals in need!

On Saturday, April 2 – Sunday, April 3, the ARL will host a Cat Food Drive, to provide food for the homeless cats of

cat food drive

All donations of cat food will help feed hundreds of homeless cats in the community.

Boston. We’ll accept donations of unopened wet or dry cat food from 9:00am – 3:30pm both days in the lobby of our headquarters located in Boston’s South End:

Animal Rescue League of Boston

Boston Adoption Center lobby

10 Chandler Street

Boston, MA 02116

All donations of cat food will defray the food cost associated with the on-going care of homeless cats in the community.

Cat food donations will go to community cat caretakers in Boston, as well as ARL foster volunteers who provide one-on-one care to cats recovering from surgery or re-acclimating to life in a home prior to adoption.

SPRING CLEANING…The ARL is also accepting gently used clean sheets, towels, and blankets for our animals at our adoption centers. Donations can be dropped off in the lobby of our Boston headquarters.

Sharing is caring! Click here to view/download a PDF of our flyer.

Spring_CatFoodBank_flyer

 

Meet the 2016 ARL Boston Marathon Team!

Our 6th Run as a John Hancock Boston Marathon Charity Team

Boston Marathon

Special thanks to the John Hancock Marathon Nonprofit Program for their generosity!

Thanks to the generosity of the John Hancock Marathon Nonprofit Program, four compassionate runners – Andrea Fondulas, Jillian Reig, Alexis Sheehan, and Marco Tropeano – trained through bitter cold this winter to get ready for the 120th running of the Boston Marathon.

The 2016 ARL Boston Marathon team has two very big goals – to raise over $30,000 and finish the grueling 26.2 mile course!
Learn more about why our team members chose to run for the ARL and how you can support them below….

Boston MarathonMeet Andrea
“To be running my very first marathon for a cause I am so incredibly passionate about is honestly a dream come true for me. I know there is a long road ahead of me (quite literally) but I am so excited to embark on this adventure.”

Click here to support Andrea.


Boston MarathonMeet Jillian
“This will be my first ever marathon and the only cause that would motivate me to train all winter and run a marathon is helping animals in need. I am running in memory of my first foster dog, a pit bull named Penny and my childhood dog, a black lab named Quig.”

Click here to support Jillian.


Boston MarathonMeet Marco
“I’ve ran many races in the past 8 years, but I’m happy to say that this year’s Boston Marathon will be most meaningful. Being able to run for the Animal Rescue League of Boston is a tremendous opportunity to give back to the innocent lives of fellow animals that are our friends.”

Click here to support Marco.


Boston MarathonMeet Alexis
“I am honored to be running for team ARL for the second consecutive year in a row! My experience last year on team ARL Boston instilled a deep passion and appreciation for how the Animal Rescue League of Boston seeks to save animal lives, raise the standards of animal advocacy, change animal legislation and inspire our community.”

Click here to support Alexis.


A VERY SPECIAL THANKS to the dedicated runners on our 2016 Boston Marathon team! Our four team members have trained hard and worked tirelessly to raise money for animals in our community.

Show your support for team members by making a donation to an individual runner or on the ARL Boston Marathon Team fundraising page at https://www.crowdrise.com/ARLBoston2016 or spread the word on social media using #RunBold.

 

Super Smalls Sponsorship Fund Drive – 1 Day Left!

Last day to help support ARL’s Super Smalls on Clear the Shelters Day

DONATE during the Super Smalls Sponsorship Fund Drive, and your contribution will help sponsor the adoption fee of ARL’s small shelter pets on Clear the Shelters Day, this Saturday, August 15!

Donate TODAY during the Super Smalls Sponsorship Fund Drive to help ARL's small animals find loving homes on Clear the Shelters Day!

Donate TODAY during the Super Smalls Sponsorship Fund Drive to help ARL’s small animals find loving homes on Clear the Shelters Day!

Thanks to a generous grant from the ASPCA, ARL’s shelters in Boston, Brewster, and Dedham are offering $50 OFF the adoption fees of all adult cats and dogs during Clear the Shelters Day!

At the ARL, we know that big things come in small packages, which is why we want to support our Super Smalls to help them find loving homes this summer too!

DONATE NOW

Your donation will go even further because ARL’s adoption fees include a large number of veterinary and behavioral services, such as: spay or neuter surgery, vaccinations, health screening and veterinary examination, behavioral screening and evaluations, and a microchip.

The ARL does not receive any government or public funding and relies solely on supporters like you to give animals the care and loving homes they need.

Visit arlboston.kintera.org/supersmalls or click the green button below to make a donation now.

donatenowbutton

Not ready to adopt? Click here to learn other ways that you can make a difference in the lives of ARL’s Super Pets.

THANK YOU to our media partners NBCUniversal, NECN, WBZ 1030, and Clear Channel for helping to spread the word about the importance of animal adoptions.

…and to the ASPCA for making the Animal Rescue League of Boston a grant recipient for Clear the Shelters Day.

clear the shelters

 

Bark-off Your Calendar: 9 Days ’til Paws in the Park

Delicious local food vendors to join the fun

Only 9 days to go! Bring your family– and your appetite– to ARL’s Paws in the Park on May 30th at Drummer Boy Park in Brewster! This popular dog-friendly pet festival on Cape Cod has tons of activities, entertainment, and prizes for humans and dogs of all ages.

DETAILS
Saturday, May 30
11AM – 3PM
Drummer Boy Park, Brewster

Rain or shine!

$5 admission fee for adults, FREE for children under 12 years old and dogs. All proceeds from the event benefit the Animal Rescue League’s Brewster Shelter.

Dog frisbee show

Don’t miss the Frisbee Dog Show!

Here is a sneak peek of the fun to expect: *NEW for 2015

A special swag bag for the first 500 entrants

Paws Pool Pavillion*

Paws Raffle Prize Pavillion*

“Sniff it Out” Scavenger Hunt*

David Louis, animal communicator*

Photo “Doggie” Kissing Booth

Frisbee Dog Show

K9-unit demo

Pupcasso art activity for dogs

Fleece tug toy activity for dogs*

Face painting and temporary tattoos

Contests

Book signings*

DJ music

And much more!

Thank you to the following local businesses who will join Paws in the Park 2015 as food vendors!

Laurino’s Restaurant & Tavern

The Local Scoop

John’s Dogs

Find more announcements about activities, food, and entertainment at arlboston.org/paws-in-park

 

See Something, Say Something: Understanding The Effects of “Blood Sports” on Animals

If you see signs of blood sports, you say something – how you can help animals

As part of our “See Something, Say Something – Report Animal Cruelty” public awareness campaign this month, we are focusing on the topic of “blood sports.”

A dog who is a victim of the illegal blood sports known as “dog fighting” and “street fighting” suffers just as much on the inside as he does on the outside.

We sat down with Dr. Martha Smith-Blackmore, the ARL’s vice president of animal welfare, to learn more about the effects of blood sports on the animals involved.

blood sports

Dr. Martha Smith-Blackmore, ARL’s Vice President of Animal Welfare, hosted a talk in January on dog fighting by the ASPCA’s Terry Mills in conjunction with the New England Federation of Humane Societies

ARL Blog: What are some common physically identifying signs of a fighting dog?

Dr. Smith: Fighting dogs end up bearing many scars, usually clustered around the face, neck, front legs and chest. Dogs can also suffer much more severe injuries such as broken bones and disfigurement of their ears, snouts, etc.

The scars that are visible on the outside of a fighting dog are only the tip of the iceberg in what the dog has suffered.

ARL Blog: What generally happens to the “winner” – or worse yet – the “loser” in a dog fight?

Dr S: Dogs who “win” will fight again and again, earning higher stakes with each victory.

Dogs who “lose” have a much sadder fate. They have been discovered on the side of the road, floating in the harbor, and in the garbage.  They can die shortly after the fight from trauma, but more commonly they die from a lack of appropriate veterinary attention to their wounds.

Ultimately, all dogs become the “loser” and thus find themselves abused multiple times: by inhumane housing and emotional neglect, by the fights themselves, by the life threatening infections they develop, and by the cruel deaths they suffer at the hands of their owners.

ARL Blog: What are some other “blood sports” that people should be aware of and what are the physical effects on the animals involved?

Dr S: Cockfighting (two roosters) and finch fighting (perching birds) are common in Massachusetts.

During Cockfighting between two gamecocks, owners will inject a toxic form of pesticide to increase their endurance and often attach knives to the bird’s legs. Every fight ends in serious injury or death, often for both of the birds involved.

Finch fighting between two male and one female bird has become increasingly popular due to the birds’ small size, docile nature, and ease of transport. During finch fighting the owner will attach blades to the males’ feet and sharpen their beaks to ensure maximum injury to the female finch which ultimately results in their demise.

Learn more about signs of dog-related blood sports

 

I Found A Baby Bird. What Do I Do Now?

The ARL provides tips on when and how to rescue a baby bird on the ground

Spring has sprung. The sun is shining. Flowers are blooming. And baby birds are learning to fly.

This time of year, The ARL receives phone calls from concerned citizens who come across baby birds on the ground. Although this sight may seem alarming, remember that part of the process of learning to fly comes with being on the ground. It’s typically best to keep a safe distance and not to intervene unless you’re sure the bird is orphaned or is in immediate danger.

To decide whether or not to step in the next time you spot a baby bird on the ground, follow this helpful flow chart:

What to do if you find a baby bird - flowchart

If the flow chart points you toward intervention, follow these 11 steps to ensure a safe rescue:

How to rescue a baby bird*†:

  1. Grab clean container with a lid and line the bottom with a soft cloth. Poke air holes if there are none.
  2. Wear gloves to protect yourself from the bird’s beak, talons, wings, and any potential parasites.
  3. Cover the bird with a light sheet or towel.
  4. Gently pick up the bird and place it in the prepared container.
  5. Warm the bird if it’s chilled by placing one end of the container on top of a heating pad (low setting) or in a shallow dish of warm water. You can also wrap the container with the warm cloth.
  6. Tape the container closed.
  7. Note exactly where you found the bird. This will be very important for release.
  8. Keep the bird in a warm dark quiet place away from children and animals. Do not give it food or water.
  9. Wash your hands and any clothing and objects that were in contact with the bird to avoid spreading any potential parasites.
  10. Contact a wildlife rehabilitator, state wildlife agency, or wildlife veterinarian.
  11. Get the bird to the wildlife expert as soon as possible. It is against the law in most states to keep wild animals in your home if you do not have a permit, even if you plan to release them.

To find a wildlife expert in your area, contact the New England Wildlife Center.

 

*Only adults should rescue baby birds. Before rescuing an adult bird, seek guidance from a wildlife expert.

†Source: Healers of the Wild: People Who Care For Injured and Orphaned Wildlife, By Shannon K. Jacobs