Cat in Tree Quickly Warms Up To ARL Rescue Team

Normally an indoor cat, on Sunday one-year-old August decided to dash outside to check out her Taunton neighborhood, and on Monday her owner’s family located her — stuck and scared near the top of a 50-foot tree.

After three days of being in the tree and showing no signs of being able to climb down herself, neighbors had called around for help but to no avail, and finally contacted the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Rescue Services. Once on-scene and surrounded by a throng of bystanders, Manager of Rescue Services Brian O’Conner and Senior Rescue Technician Bill Tanguay assessed the situation, keeping in mind that action had to be taken quickly as August continued to climb and move around on the tiny branches.

“The tree she was in was skinny especially near the top, and wouldn’t be able to bear a lot of weight, so we decided that climbing an adjacent tree would be the best course, with the hopes that she would come to us,” Tanguay said.

Tanguay geared up and climbed the tree next to where August was, and she quickly realized that ARL was her ticket to get out of the situation. Not only becoming increasingly vocal, August also displayed her kitty nimbleness, using a number of slow and methodic moves to descend about 10 feet to get within reach of her rescuer.

“This rescue was more difficult than most,” Tanguay said. “We couldn’t get to where the cat was, but we got lucky and she saw us as her lifeline so the cat did the work and came to us.”

After climbing around Tanguay’s head and shoulders, August was placed in a protective carrier and enjoyed the slow repel to the ground and of course being reunited with her family.

“The Animal Rescue (of Boston) is the best, and he (Tanguay) is the bravest man I’ve ever seen!” exclaimed one bystander.

Who You Gonna Call?

ARL is the only animal welfare agency in Massachusetts that has a technically-trained rescue team that responds to animal-related emergencies and rescue situations. If you need help for an animal, please call (617) 426-9170, then hit “1” for Animal Rescue Services. The ARL receives no government or public funding to help animals distressed, YOU make our work possible.

 

Update on Westport Farm Case

UPDATE: Attorney General Announces Indictments for 27 Individuals in New England’s Largest Animal Cruelty Case

In July 2016, the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) Law Enforcement Department, staff, volunteers, along with other humane organizations and law enforcement departments, helped remove more than 1,400 animals living in unimaginable conditions on a 70-acre property in Westport, MA.

westport

Westport, July 2016.

What followed was the largest animal cruelty investigation in New England history, and today Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey announced the indictments of 27 people facing a collective 151 counts of animal cruelty.
The indictment returned by a Statewide Grand Jury on Thursday is the result of a collaborative investigation involving ARL, Westport Police, Massachusetts Environmental Police, the Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources (MDAR), and the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA).
ARL Investigator Lt. Alan Borgal was one of the first on-scene at the Westport Farm.
“This situation is unparalleled to anything I’ve seen in my 37 years as an animal law enforcement officer,” Borgal said. “The sheer number of animals in dire need of care, and the cruel and unsanitary conditions we found were deplorable. It took an all-out effort of state and local officials along with multiple humane organizations to get all those animals out of that horrible situation.”
Property owner Richard Medieros is facing 21 counts of animal cruelty, and all but two of the defendants are facing more than one count of animal cruelty.
“Hundreds of animals on this farm were kept in deplorable and dangerous conditions, with inadequate food, water, or shelter, many of them suffering from severe health ailments that required them to be euthanized,” said AG Healey. “As a result of our investigation, the owner of this farm and its tenants will be held responsible for the inhumane treatment of these animals.”
The defendants are expected to be arraigned in Bristol Superior Court at a future date.

 

 

 

 

ARL Assists in Foxboro Deer Rescue

Deer was Found Upside-Down After Getting Trapped Between Two Fences

Animal League of Boston (ARL) Rescue Services were dispatched to Foxboro at around 9:30 a.m. Monday (3/27/17) morning to assist the town’s Animal Control Officer in freeing a deer that had become trapped between two eight-foot fences that funneled into an enclosure at 191 Mechanic Street in Foxboro.

The width between the two fences where the deer was trapped was only between five inches and a foot wide, and in its panic to get free, the deer wound up upside-down and wedged in the tight space. With the land owner’s permission, a section of the fence was removed, and with some assistance, the deer was able to roll over, stand up, and was soon walking normally. Despite being shaken up and suffering several abrasions, the deer appeared to be uninjured from the ordeal, and when ushered to the edge of the property, Foxboro Police stopped traffic so the deer could cross the street and return to the wild.

Foxboro Deer 3.27

Despite being turned upside-down when trapped, this deer avoided serious injury and returned to the wild safely.

The ARL is the only animal welfare agency in Massachusetts with a technically-trained rescue team that responds to animal-related emergencies and rescue situations. ARL Rescue Services can be contacted at (617) 426-9170.

 

I Found A Baby Bird. What Do I Do Now?

The ARL provides tips on when and how to rescue a baby bird on the ground

Spring has sprung. The sun is shining. Flowers are blooming. And baby birds are learning to fly.

This time of year, The ARL receives phone calls from concerned citizens who come across baby birds on the ground. Although this sight may seem alarming, remember that part of the process of learning to fly comes with being on the ground. It’s typically best to keep a safe distance and not to intervene unless you’re sure the bird is orphaned or is in immediate danger.

To decide whether or not to step in the next time you spot a baby bird on the ground, follow this helpful flow chart:

What to do if you find a baby bird - flowchart

If the flow chart points you toward intervention, follow these 11 steps to ensure a safe rescue:

How to rescue a baby bird*†:

  1. Grab clean container with a lid and line the bottom with a soft cloth. Poke air holes if there are none.
  2. Wear gloves to protect yourself from the bird’s beak, talons, wings, and any potential parasites.
  3. Cover the bird with a light sheet or towel.
  4. Gently pick up the bird and place it in the prepared container.
  5. Warm the bird if it’s chilled by placing one end of the container on top of a heating pad (low setting) or in a shallow dish of warm water. You can also wrap the container with the warm cloth.
  6. Tape the container closed.
  7. Note exactly where you found the bird. This will be very important for release.
  8. Keep the bird in a warm dark quiet place away from children and animals. Do not give it food or water.
  9. Wash your hands and any clothing and objects that were in contact with the bird to avoid spreading any potential parasites.
  10. Contact a wildlife rehabilitator, state wildlife agency, or wildlife veterinarian.
  11. Get the bird to the wildlife expert as soon as possible. It is against the law in most states to keep wild animals in your home if you do not have a permit, even if you plan to release them.

To find a wildlife expert in your area, contact the New England Wildlife Center.

 

*Only adults should rescue baby birds. Before rescuing an adult bird, seek guidance from a wildlife expert.

†Source: Healers of the Wild: People Who Care For Injured and Orphaned Wildlife, By Shannon K. Jacobs

 

ARL Gives Stray with Eye Condition a Second Chance at Life

Meet Zim: From a Rescue, to Patient, to Adopted!

Zim, an 11-month-old tabby classic, came to the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) after being trapped for more than two days nearly 50 feet off the ground in a tree in Brockton, MA. Responding to calls from surrounding neighbors, ARL’s Rescue Services was able to scale the tree and save the scared and vocal stray.

“He was certainly happy to be out of that tree,” said Mike Brammer, ARL’s Assistant Manager of Rescue Services. “Almost immediately you could tell that he’d been around people and was very friendly.”

Zim’s beautiful markings and sweet demeanor garnered instant attention, but so did a congenital defect called Eyelid Agenesis that was discovered during his intake exam. It’s a condition where part of the eyelid doesn’t form properly, causing fur to rub up against the cornea, resulting in chronic irritation. For Zim, both eyes were affected, increasing the concern.

“If the condition is left untreated, this chronic irritation can permanently damage the cornea and cause vision impairment,” said Dr. Erin Doyle, ARL’s Lead Veterinarian for Shelter Veterinary Services. “This chronic irritation also causes significant discomfort.”

The only way to truly fix the condition is with a skin graft; however the surgery is complicated and requires extensive post-operative care. While Zim’s condition affected both eyes, it wasn’t extremely severe, making cryosurgery an option. Zim had the procedure done by an ophthalmologist at a partner organization less than a week after being rescued out of the tree in Brockton.

“Cryosurgery does not fix the eyelid, but is used to freeze the hair follicles of the fur that is rubbing on the cornea,” Dr. Doyle said. “As such, the cryosurgery removes the chronic irritation caused by the fur and restores comfort to the eyes.”

Zim recovers from cryosurgery wearing a protective cone.

Zim recovers from cryosurgery wearing a protective cone.

ROAD TO RECOVERY

With the surgery complete, Zim settled in for a few days to recover. Despite undergoing the procedure and being placed in a protective cone, he continued to showcase his personality, purring almost immediately for all the shelter staff and volunteers who would check on the handsome tabby.

Making an excellent recovery, ARL’s veterinary staff determined exactly one week following his surgery that Zim was ready to find his forever home. Certainly not a surprise to anyone at ARL who came in contact with Zim, just a few days after being made available, he has been adopted!

Zim is ready to go to his forever home!

Zim is ready to go to his forever home!

DOING THE WORK ONE ANIMAL AT A TIME

Zim represents the collaborative effort that is necessary to fulfill ARL’s mission of being an unwavering champion for animals in need, committed to keeping them safe and healthy in habitats and homes. No matter how they come into our shelters, all animals are treated with kindness and compassion, but we cannot do the work alone.

ARL receives no government funding, and relies solely on the generosity of individuals to support programs that help animals in need. Please lend your support so ARL can continue to give animals like Zim a second chance at life.

donatenowbutton

 

February 9, 2017 – Winter Weather Closings

ARL programs and administrative offices will be closed on February 9

Due to the winter weather, ARL will be closed to the public on Thursday, February 9:

  • Administrative offices
  • Adoption centers in Boston, Brewster, and Dedham
  • Boston Veterinary Care
  • Pine Ridge Pet Cemetery
  • Rescue Services
  • Spay Waggin’

Dedicated staff and volunteers will remain at each shelter location to make sure that the animals in our care remain safe, warm, and in good spirits as the snow flies.

When a snow storm hits, we often receive an increasing number of calls from concerned citizens with questions about feral cats. We suggest trying to coax a feral cat indoors to a garage or basement for shelter. If that’s not possible, watch our helpful how-to video to build a DIY cat shelter.

For more winter weather pet safety tips, visit arlboston.org/winter-pet-health.

 

ARL Caring for Abandoned Hingham Dog

DO YOU RECOGNIZE THIS DOG? Contact Hingham PD (781) 749-1212

Note: Due to ongoing investigation, the Hingham dog is currently NOT available for adoption.

Earlier this week, a young Maltese-type dog was found abandoned in a crate along Downer Avenue in Hingham, MA. He was left with a blanket, toys, and food; but he was also left shivering in near-freezing temperatures along a busy street.

hingham dog

Do you recognize this dog? If so, please contact Hingham Police Department at (781) 749-1212.

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) is currently providing veterinary care, shelter, and kind attention for the Hingham dog. An exam by ARL’s lead veterinarian concluded that the dog is approximately 2-years-old, is not neutered, and is in good health. Volunteers and staff have remarked at how sweet-natured the dog is… and how much he loves his little treats!

The Hingham dog was not found with any identification or a microchip.

Animal abandonment is a felony offense under Massachusetts law, however surrendering is a way to give an animal a second chance at finding a forever home. An animal can be brought to organizations like ARL, a local shelter, or even a police or fire department. There are always options, but abandonment should never be one of them.

DO YOU RECOGNIZE THIS DOG?

ARL’s Law Enforcement Department is assisting the Hingham Police Department in this ongoing investigation. Anyone with information is urged to contact the Hingham Police Department (781) 749-1212 or ARL’s Law Enforcement Department (617) 226-5610.

 

Blind and Deaf Cat Learns to Trust Again

All thanks to YOUR support, Bella found a new life when it seemed hopeless for her

HELP ANIMALS NOW

Blind and deaf, Bella was locked in a camper in the summer heat. She had no one to hear her yowls and cries for help. As the temperature rose, her hopes faded.

Fortunately, Bella was one of the over 1,400 animals that ARL helped rescue from a tenant farm in Westport, MA this past July. Though this horrific case displayed many examples of animal and human resiliency, Bella’s story is one of the most unique…

When she first came to ARL, Bella cowered from people. Brief moments of peace often ended abruptly in fits of confusion and fear. She had no reason to trust people, after all, and that is perhaps most heartbreaking of all.

After about a week, however, things started to look up. Volunteers and staff observed that when given a bit of freedom, Bella enjoyed exploring. However, if left unattended, she could be quickly overwhelmed by the size and lack of boundaries in her surroundings.

In foster care, efforts were made to make her world more manageable. She played with her toys in an open cardboard box—toys designed specifically to stimulate her remaining senses—so that she wouldn’t lose them. She also tested the limits of each room in the apartment, gradually progressing in comfort from room to room.

Bella

One of Bella’s favorite pastimes included laying on windowsills at her ARL foster home.

Over time, Bella learned to trust again. Though her steps were tender, she became more pet-able. She climbed into her foster mother’s lap more often.

Soon after returning to the ARL Bella was adopted into a new loving home! Her owner reports that she confidently explores their entire three-story home with reckless abandon.

Only because of your support, did Bella’s story have a happy ending.

Bella

You can help even more animals in 2017!

Bella is a striking reminder of why ARL continues its important work to fight for animals’ welfare in Massachusetts. With your help, we can get at the root causes of neglect and abuse to ensure that all animals have a chance at a safe and healthy home .

Your year-end gift before December 31, will not only help us prepare for helping even more animals in need in 2017, but also let you take your contribution into account on your 2016 tax return to the extent allowable under law.

We still need to raise over $317,000 by December 31 to meet our year-end goal and start the new year fully funded.

Thank you for being a champion for animals in need and for giving generously today! Click the red button below to…

HELP ANIMALS NOW

 

 

Top 10 Animal Rescues of 2016

Over 3,780 animals were assisted by ARL’s Rescue Services in 2016

Animals found in distress are a common occurrence across the Commonwealth. All because of your unwavering support, however, ARL stands ready to answer the call for help. Thank you for being a part of every on-the-ground action as we help ensure a brighter future when animals are safe and healthy in their habitats and homes.

ARL’s Rescue Services has had a momentous last 12 months, rescuing over 3,780 animals in need! Today we remember our top 10 animal rescues of 2016:

1. 1,400 Westport farm animals – In July, ARL assisted over 1,400 animals living in deplorable conditions in the largest farm animal cruelty case the Northeast has ever seen. ARL’s staff and volunteers worked around-the-clock to assist in the rescue, removal, and specialized emergency veterinary treatment of goats, pigs, horses, dogs, cats, rabbits, cattle, and birds, and other species in dire need of assistance. Many of the animals who remained in ARL’s care after the rescue found their forever homes.

Puppies found at Westport, MA
2. 47 Dorchester birds –  In September, Rescue Services responded to a call from a Dorchester resident regarding her cat that had become ill and the observation of birds falling from trees. An astonishing 47 Grackle-type birds had fallen to the ground, sick, thrashing and unable to fly, or were unresponsive. ARL quickly moved the birds into isolation and notified neighbors to keep their pets indoors. While many of the birds were too ill to save, 15 were healthy enough to be transferred to a partner wildlife organization for specialized care.

Dorchester birds
3. 9 Jamaica Plain kittens – In April, the Veteran’s Hospital called ARL regarding a cat stuck under the building. Rescue Services arrived on the scene heard faint meowing from behind the cinder blocks. Slowly, but surely, the team pulled out not 1, not 2, but 9 little kittens who had been trapped under the cold foundation.

JP kittens
4. 8 Lexington ducklings – In April, a concerned citizen heard a distressed chirping sound from down below street level;  8 fuzzy little ducklings had fallen into a storm drain. Local police and firefighters helped ARL’s Rescue Services lift multiple drain covers to locate the frightened ducklings – all while the mother duckling nervously looked on. Fortunately, all 8 ducklings were brought up to safety and reunited with their mother at the local creek several blocks away.

Lexington duckling

5. Brookline turtle – In February, ARL was called for help when a turtle was spotted motionless on top of the icy pond at Larz Anderson Park. Rescue Services bundled up in cold-weather gear and carefully slid out onto the ice to rescue the Snapper with a large net. When they didn’t get a reaction, it was obvious that the turtle was in significant distress; the team immediately brought the turtle to a partner veterinarian to warm up and receive supportive care.

Brookline turtle
6. 4 Randolph raccoons – In March, the staff at Red Line Freight Systems had a surprise while unloading a trailer – 3 baby raccoons! Their crew carefully unloaded more pallets while ARL searched for the mother raccoon. Lo and behold, the mom was found hiding behind the last pallet and the family was released back into the wild together in an adjacent wooded area.

Baby raccoons and mother
7. Yarmouth Port cat – In September, Rescue Services faced one of their more difficult cases this year of a cat stuck in tree (there have been 108 such cases in 2016 to date!). On this extremely windy day, this particular terrified kitty continued to move further and further out on the tree limbs – just out of Rescue Services’ reach. Thanks to some patience and their extensive technical training, however, the team was able to bring the climbing cat down to safety.

Yarmouth Port cat
8. Brookline owl – In December, a Great Horned Owl found himself in quite the predicament; he’d gotten himself tangled in a soccer net. Rescue Services worked carefully to extract the feathered bird from the net and brought him back to a partner organization for observation and a good night’s rest before releasing him back into the wild the next day.

Brookline owl
9. Revere dog  - In February, a tiny dog named Frankie and his owner got into a car crash. Startled by the collision, Frankie jumped out of the vehicle and fled from the scene. Fortunately, the next morning, the scared pup was picked up by Rescue Services running along I-93. After hours of searching and a post on social media regarding a missing dog, ARL was able to reunite Frankie with his owner, who was released from the hospital post-accident with a clean bill of health.

Frankie and his owners
10. Hanover “Santa” squirrel – In December, ARL was called to help a squirrel that had a dog bone stuck around its neck. From afar, local residents mistook the bone as a white beard, which is why they named him “Santa Squirrel”. Rescue Services set up a humane peanut butter trap to capture the critter and brought him back to ARL to free him from the bone necklace. The squirrel was released back into the wild soon thereafter – just in time for the holidays.

Squirrel

Let’s help even more animals in 2017 – together!

Your year-end gift before December 31, will not only help us prepare for helping even more animals in need in 2017, but also let you take your contribution into account on your 2016 tax return to the extent allowable under law.

We still need to raise over $350,000 by December 31 to meet our year-end goal and start the new year fully funded.

Thank you for being a champion for animals in need and for giving generously today! Click the red button below to…

HELP ANIMALS NOW

 

 

After Losing Their Owners, Two Senior Pets Depended on ARL

Sandy and Jasmine relied on ARL -and a touch of fate- to help them find their new forever homes after losing their owners

HELP ANIMALS NOW

It’s heartbreaking to see an owner lose their pet. It’s equally as devastating to see a pet lose their owner.

At the ARL, we frequently see cases of the latter – typically senior pets that had senior owners who were ill. As tragic as these cases are, these situations often have a happy outcome for the pets involved.

Read this incredible story about how ARL helped two senior dogs that lost their owners much too soon… 

Sandy, a 7-year-old Chow mix dog, was rescued by ARL in 2013 after roaming an industrial park in the Greater Boston Area for over a year. Because of the prolonged exposure to rain and snow, Sandy had lost a majority of her fur. Her skin red and raw, her body exhausted and emaciated, she spent her first few days at ARL cowering behind her bed. With intensive veterinary care, behavior and enrichment training, along with plenty of love and attention from staff and volunteers, Sandy slowly began to heal.

Several months later, Sandy met Bill, a gentleman who had recently lost both his beloved wife and dog. He had been looking for a companion to share his golden years with. After hearing Sandy’s story, Bill knew that she’d be the perfect canine companion and adopted her. The duo had a wonderful life together, until, sadly, Bill passed away a short time later.

Quirky, arthritic, and wary of strangers, Sandy returned to ARL’s Brewster shelter where volunteers and staff showered her with extra TLC. For almost 6 months she waited patiently hoping to find another special family to call her own.

As luck would have it, Ralph, a Cape Cod resident, was looking for a senior dog. Needless to say, he and Sandy were the perfect pair. On adoption day, Sandy jumped right into his truck  - arthritis and all – and fell asleep on Ralph’s lap before they’d even left the parking lot. Sandy lived a happy life with Ralph for 2 years, until she recently passed away from bladder cancer.

Sandy and Bill

Sandy (pictured left) at our Brewster Adoption Center and with her adopter Ralph.

Meanwhile… Jasmine, a 8-year-old long-haired Rottweiler, was surrender to ARL’s Brewster shelter in January 2016 due to financial reasons. She was adopted shortly thereafter, however, she came back to us in October when, like Sandy, her owner had died. Luck was not on her side.

A tough senior girl, Jasmine was very particular and did not get along with other dogs at the shelter. ARL’s volunteers and staff were concerned about her future adoptability and knew that she just had to go home with someone special.

As fate would have it, Ralph, who was still grieving the loss of his canine companion Sandy, saw Jasmine’s photo on arlboston.org and instantly felt a connection with her. After a 48 hour trial, Ralph fell in love with Jasmine and brought her home – just in time for the holidays! By all accounts, the new pair are doing wonderfully together.

Jasmine and Bill

It was love at first sight for Jasmine and Ralph!

Although tragedy can pull pets and their owners apart, the ARL stands ready to jump in and connect both animals and people with the resources they need to make things right – all thanks to supporters like you.

A special message from ARL’s President Mary Nee…

My deepest thanks to everyone who answered my request for help last week with a generous donation for animals in need.

As a result, we are 25% closer to goal and now have to raise $425,000 by December 31 to meet our budget for the coming year,

Please give as generously as you can and let us start the new year with the resources to respond whenever we receive that call for animals in need. Click to the red button below to…

HELP ANIMALS NOW

Thank you and best wishes for a happy and healthy New Year.

Sincerely,

Mary Nee, President of ARL