Cape Cod National Seashore Rangers Assist in Cat Rescue

Cat in Desperate Need of Medical Attention Discovered at Marconi Beach

Thanks to the life-saving efforts of three Cape Cod National Seashore employees, a former stray cat is now on the mend and in the care of the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL).

The rescue occurred on the day Marconi Beach opened for the summer season. An off-duty National Park Service employee was showing his family the work that had been done at the beach following a harsh Cape Cod winter, and noticed a calico cat, who looked like she needed assistance, taking shelter under a bench.

Park Rangers Meghan Farrell and Tyler Paul responded to the call and began searching for the cat. Outside one of the Marconi Beach bathrooms, the rangers heard a pleading meow.

“We entered the bathroom, and found the cat wedged between a toilet and the wall,” Farrell said. “She was in really rough shape, was soaking wet from the rain, was covered in ticks, and looked very thin.”

With the cat secured, the rangers contacted the Wellfleet Animal Control Officer, who contacted ARL. Aptly named “Marconi” was then brought to ARL’s Animal Care & Adoption Center in Brewster. She was indeed in rough shape.

“Marconi arrived at the shelter hypothermic and dehydrated,” said Dr. Erin Doyle, ARL’s Lead Veterinarian for Shelter Veterinary Services. “She clearly didn’t have appropriate access to food or water, but she was treated by the Brewster staff with supportive care immediately after intake and quickly began improving.”

Additionally, dozens of ticks needed to be removed, and Marconi had ulcerations to her pads that were likely related to a viral illness induced by the stress of her situation. Her injuries have been treated, and since being in foster care she has gained two pounds. Once Marconi is given a clean bill of health, she will be available for adoption.

 Take Action

ARL wants to remind you that if you see a stray or any animal in need, to please contact your local animal control officer, and/or ARL’s Rescue Services immediately.

 

UPDATE: Maybelle Gets First Measurement

Weight Loss to be Gauged by Inches Lost

When Maybelle the pot-bellied pig first came to the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) several months ago, she weighed 196 pounds and could barely stand, let alone walk; and her overgrown hooves were causing severe discomfort. While she is still grossly overweight, Maybelle is making progress.

Because she is still relatively immobile, getting Maybelle on a scale is a difficult task. So this week Dedham Animal Care & Adoption Center staff recorded her first waist measurement, and will chart Maybelle’s progress in the coming months by the number of inches she loses.

Currently Maybelle’s waist measures 48 inches– that’s 4 feet round!

While it may be difficult to physically see her weight loss, Maybelle has shed some pounds, and is able to stand and move around a little easier–a roll of fat is unfortunately still blocking her eyes so she can’t see. A secondary concern for the pot-bellied pig was her mental state. Maybelle was depressed when she came to ARL, however she seems to be turning a corner, thanks to constant visits and encouragement from ARL staff and volunteers. She has also grown a fan-base, as many people who come to the Dedham Animal Care & Adoption Center ask to see her. Overall, there’s a long road ahead, but Maybelle is certainly trending in the right direction.

ARL’s veterinary staff want Maybelle to lose weight safely–meaning it will be a slow and steady process. She is still receiving 6 small meals a day and has drastically reduced her caloric intake. Make sure to check back often to see Maybelle’s progress!

Extended Care

It’s expected that Maybelle’s weight loss and rehabilitation will take up to a year, meaning she will be in the care of ARL much longer than a typical shelter animal. From food and shelter, to on-going veterinary care, costs to take care of Maybelle will run in the thousands. ARL does not receive government funding, and relies solely on the generosity of individuals to help animals in need like Maybelle. Please donate today by clicking the icon below to help Maybelle and animals like her.

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Fourth of July Pet Safety Tips

Help Keep Your Pet Happy, Healthy, and Worry-Free

BBQ’s, beaches, fireworks and gatherings with friends and family. For humans all these things add up to a picture-perfect Fourth of July holiday. However, for your dog, the sun, crowds, and loud noises can lead to over-stimulation, fear, and a potentially harmful situation.

The Animal Rescue League of Boston wants you to enjoy the celebration of our nation, but please remember these 5 simple, but important tips to create a safe environment for your dog if they must be with you.

  1. Keep your dog away from potentially hazardous objects. Keep your pet away from BBQ’s, fireworks and even sparklers. Think about fireworks for a moment. A sudden bang, a flash of light: these are ingredients for striking fear into your beloved dog, and some animals become “fearfully aggressive” due to loud noises, so keep a close eye on them, especially around children.
  2. Leave your pup indoors in a small, quiet, and cool room. Turning a TV or radio on at low volume can distract your dog from all the outside noises. Also allow them some room to roam around, so they don’t feel too confined.
  3. If they must be outside, keep your canine in a carrier or on a leash. Set your dog up in style with shade, ample air-flow, and access to cold water.
  4. Never leave your dog alone in a parked car if they must travel with you. When the temperature rises it’s Too Hot for Spot! Remember, animals don’t sweat like humans do and can overheat easily. Even with seemingly mild outside temperatures, the inside of a car can heat up to well over 100 degrees in a matter of minutes, which can lead to deadly heat stroke. It is also illegal in Massachusetts to leave an animal in a parked car, owners can face fines or even forfeiture of the animal.
  5. Make sure your dog’s microchip and ID tag information is current. Many animal shelters report an increase of stray animals after July 4th due to the number of pets running away from the noise and excitement. Be sure your contact information is correct and up-to-date, and always on your pup’s collar to ensure an easy reunion should they become separated from you.

Play it Safe

Leaving your dog at home is always the best bet and the right decision for you and your pet. Prevention is responsible pet ownership.

 

 

 

 

When the Temperature Rises — It’s TOO HOT FOR SPOT

ARL Wants Your Pet to be Safe and Comfortable All Summer Long

In typical New England fashion, this week spring suddenly turned into summer, with heat, humidity and near record-setting temperatures forecasted. As part of the Animal Rescue League of Boston’s (ARL) annual safety campaign, “Too Hot for Spot”, ARL wants to remind pet owners about the dangers of leaving an animal in a hot car.

As temperatures rise, so do concerns about animal safety. Even with temperatures below 80 degrees, the threat for heat stroke still exists. Remember, pets don’t sweat like humans do, making them unable to cool their bodies efficiently in the heat.

Keep your pet safe and healthy by following these important guidelines:

  •      Prevention is always your best bet. Whenever possible, leave your pet at home in a low humidity and temperature-controlled room.
  •      If your pet must be outdoors, find a shady spot with ample air flow to prevent overheating.
  •      Hydration. This is key, so keep a bowl of cold water accessible at all times.
  •      Exercise wisely. Limit exercise to the morning or evening hours when temperatures are at their coolest.
  •      Never leave your pet alone in a parked car. When the outside temperature is just 80 degrees, inside a parked car, the temperature can rise to more than 100 degrees in a matter of minutes, leaving your pet susceptible to deadly heat stroke. It’s also illegal in Massachusetts, thanks to the passage of S. 2369.

Prevention is Responsible Pet Ownership

By following these simple guidelines, you can help your pet limit the possibility for any heat-related health issues. However, if you notice excessive panting, weakness, rapid breathing or balance issues, and suspect a heat-related problem, bring your pet to a veterinarian immediately.

 

Memorial Day Weekend Travel Tips to Keep Your Dog Cool and Calm

Things to keep in mind if you’re bringing your furry friend along for the ride

Memorial Day Weekend is just days away, and for many of us it means three things — Honoring our service men and women; spending time with friends and family and; travelling!

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) and Boston Veterinary Care (BVC) want to remind you that busy holiday weekends can be stressful and dangerous for your pup.

While temperatures during Memorial Day Weekend are expected to be seasonal, even when the outside temperature is 70 degrees, the inside of a car can heat up to more than 100 degrees in a matter of minutes — even with the windows left partially opened! That’s why leaving your pet inside of a hot car is the most common cause of deadly heat stroke — it’s just TOO HOT FOR SPOT! Remember, pets don’t sweat like humans do and cannot cool their bodies efficiently in hot temperatures.

If you plan on taking your best friend along for the ride this weekend, here are some tips to help keep your dog safe:

  1. Never leave your pup alone in a parked car if they must travel with you. Not only are hot cars the most common cause for heat stroke, but leaving an animal inside a parked car is ILLEGAL in Massachusetts.
  2. Just like us, dogs need bathroom breaks! When driving long distances, be sure to periodically find a safe area to pull over to allow your pup to do their business, and get a little fresh water and perhaps some food.
  3. Always keep your canine on a leash or in a carrier if they must be outside. Find a shady spot with plenty of air flow and lots of fresh water.
  4. Keep them away from dangerous objects. Secure your pet a good distance from sparklers, BBQs, and pools. Additionally, there are many plants and flowers that can be toxic to dogs, so make sure your pet is under constant supervision while outdoors.
  5. Loud noises can be spooky! Things like fireworks and other loud noises can make a dog “fearfully aggressive,” so monitor your dog and keep them calm, especially around children.
  6. Make sure your dog’s microchip and ID tag information is current. Many animal shelters report increases of “stray” animals during holidays due to the number of pets running away from the noise and excitement. Make sure your contact information is current and always on your dog’s collar to ensure an easy reunion should they be separated from you.

Prevention is responsible pet ownership. When in doubt, leave your pet at home in a quiet, cool room. Turn on a TV or radio to help distract from outside noises and leave them free to roam around so they don’t feel too confined.

 

Animal Rescue League of Boston Opposes Livestock Board Bill

In November 2016, Question 3, the Act to Prevent Cruelty to Farm Animals, was supported by 78 percent of voters in Massachusetts. The landslide victory made it clear that citizens throughout the Commonwealth strongly support modest animal welfare standards. Now, certain lawmakers who opposed Question 3 are looking to establish a livestock board which would jeopardize the establishment of these modest standards.

The Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL), along with partner organizations HSUS and the MSPCA, are strongly opposed to H. 441 (An Act to Promote the Care and Well-Being of Livestock).

H. 441 would put critical animal prote31616078673_47a5650533_octions and food safety decisions in the hands of factory farmers and their allies with all livestock regulations required to be approved by a 2/3 majority. Only 2 of 13 board seats are allotted to animal welfare organizations (ARL and MSPCA).

“It is our belief that H. 441 would remove all of the hard-earned gains for farm animals that the citizens of Massachusetts obviously supported by the overwhelming passage of Question 3,” said Nadine Pellegrini, ARL’s Director of Advocacy. “H. 441 is misleading to the extent that it names ARL to the board without its consent and over its opposition to the establishment of such a board. The voters should not be deceived by this tactic and should not think that this bill will further humane protection for farm animals.”

 

Call to Action

ARL encourages you to contact your state representative or state senator and urge them to oppose Bill H. 411, which would create an unbalanced and unaccountable board that may endanger protections for Massachusetts’s farm animals.

 

Whiskers & Wine: A Special Night for ARL’s Biggest Supporters

On Tuesday, May 16, the Fairmont Copley Plaza in Boston played host for more than 200 of ARL’s biggest supporters during the third annual Whiskers & Wine President’s Council Spring Reception.

The annual event gives ARL’s corporate sponsors, Board of Directors, Leadership Council, President’s Council (those who donate $1K or more annually), volunteers, and staff the opportunity to toast and celebrate its most committed supporters, who make our important work possible.

Throughout the evening, the historic Oval Room was alive with conversations containing a common thread — ARL’s continued excellence and stand-alone innovation in being an unwavering champion for animals in need. Click here to see photos.

During the speaking program portion of the evening, key ARL stakeholders discussed the impact that our donors’ generosity has on the thousands of animals who receive care through ARL’s programs and services each year. ARL served 17,884 animals in 2016 alone!

Malcolm McDonald, ARL’s Board Chair, kicked off the speaking program in grand style, with a big thank you to everyone who made the event, and the organization’s important work possible. He spoke emotionally about the bond we all share with animals, and with excitement about the innovative vision for ARL’s future.

ARL President Mary Nee also shared the successes of 2016, and the progress that has been made during Year 1 of ARL’s new mission statement of being an unwavering champion for animals in need, committed to keeping them safe and healthy in habitats and homes.

“Our new mission and vision will guide our work in the years to come by providing community based service, getting to the root cause of problems, helping both people and animals, supporting accessible community-based veterinary services, and advocating for permanent changer to law and policy protecting animals,” Nee said.

To demonstrate ARL’s new mission in action, guests enjoyed a film highlighting the organization’s “Community Cat Initiative” which is the first of its kind in Massachusetts. Click here to see an in-house produced video about this exciting initiative!

Walter Kenyon, ARL’s Leadership Council Chair, closed out the evening by sharing his thoughts and excitement about ARL’s future, and once again thanked those in the audience who are truly committed to making a difference in the lives of animals in need.

VERY SPECIAL THANKS TO… Our generous donors for expressing your love for animals, compassion, and kindness through your support of the Animal Rescue League of Boston!

…and to our corporate supporters of Whiskers & Wine 2017…

BEST IN SHOW SPONSORS

Mintz Levin

Katherine Burdon

Anonymous

TOP DOG SPONSORS

City Side Subaru

Eastern Bank

McCall/Almy

Winter Wyman

Malcolm McDonald & Susan Passoni

TOP CAT SPONSORS

Fish & Bone

Herb Chambers

Hounds About Town

Grossman Marketing Group

MFS

Blue Hills Bank

Dedham Savings Bank

AAF CPAs

Boston Red Dog Pet Resort & Spa

Lee Ann & Michael Leahy

Marsh & McLennan Agency

Douglas Zeghibe

ANIMAL ADVOCATE SPONSORS

Bowditch & Dewey

Century Bank

D’Tails Pet Boutique

East Boston Savings Bank

Kirkiles & Associates Commercial Insurance

Mark J. Lanza, Esq.

Sullivan & Worcester, LLP.

Tufts Associated Health Plans, Inc.

W.B. Mason

Anonymous

A Special Thanks to the Donors of our 2017 Raffle Prizes:

Boston Red Dog Resort & Spa

Boston Veterinary Care

Canine Company

D’Tails Pet Boutique

Kim Roderiques, Photographer

Paula Ogier, Artist

Unleashed by Petco

 

 

 

Animal Rescue League of Boston Law Enforcement Services Hosts “Tethering Law” Workshops

More than 100 Animal Control Officers Participate

In 2016, Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) Law Enforcement Services logged 151 assists with local police and state agencies. This level of success wouldn’t be possible without the cooperation and comradery between municipalities and ARL, who are all working for a common goal.

To further build relationships with state and local agencies, ARL recently held a series of law enforcement workshops to discuss, in an open forum, how to better utilize the state’s “Tethering Laws” (MGL 140 Sec. 174E and 174F), which were amended and became law in November 2016. More than 100 animal control officers (ACO’s) from throughout the Commonwealth attended.

The three sessions were held at ARL’s Animal Care & Adoption Centers in Boston and Dedham, as well as the Dennis Police Department on Cape Cod. ARL Law Enforcement was thrilled with the participation.

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ARL lecture at Dennis Police Department.

“It was a significant turnout,” said Darleen Wood, ARL’s Associate Director of Law Enforcement. “Lectures like these give ARL the chance to work closely with municipalities from throughout the state, to ensure that everyone is on the same page, and that the ACO’s from those cities and towns know that ARL is always ready to assist their agency when animals are in need.”

“It was a great training session and it was nice to get some clarification,” said Renee Robichaud, ACO for the City of Westfield. “There’s been a lot of talk about the tethering law so it’s great to have some specifics so we as ACO’s have something to refer to when out in the field investigating.”

MGL 140 Sec. 174E allows ACO’s or Massachusetts State Police Special Officers with ARL or MSPCA the ability to cite a dog owner for:

  • Excessive tethering or chaining
  • Inadequate shelter
  • Dogs being left out in dangerous weather
  • Living conditions that may cause an animal physical or emotional harm

MGL 140 Sec. 174F, dubbed by ARL as “Too Hot for Spot”, allows law enforcement, ACO’s, and firefighters:

  • The legal ability to remove any animal left in a vehicle where conditions may impact the animal’s health
  • Allows the public to intervene, however only after specific procedures have been followed

As the temperatures rise, utilizing these statutes will be vital to protecting the health and safety of dogs across the state during the summer months, however the statute also includes extreme cold temperatures as well.

“Both of these statutes allow for the animal welfare professionals to step in before an animal experiences unnecessary suffering or even death,” Wood said. “The legislation supports animal welfare so animals can find protection from cruel or abusive situations and those inflicting such behavior can be held accountable for their actions.”

Officers may write warnings and citations for violations, with fines ranging from $50 for a first offense to $500 for subsequent offenses. Penalties may also include impoundment or loss of ownership of the dog.

Here to Help

Your vigilance is key, and if you witness or suspect animal cruelty or neglect, ARL’s Law Enforcement Services is here to help. To contact ARL Law Enforcement, call (617) 226-5610, however, if you see an animal in immediate danger, contact your local police department or animal control officer FIRST.

 

 

ARL Volunteers Are Amazing — Thank You!

Celebrations Mark Volunteer Appreciation Week

It’s Thank You Thursday, and the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) would like to extend a very special thank you to the nearly 550 volunteers that allow the organization to fulfill its mission of being an unwavering champion for animals in need.

ARL volunteers give thousands of hours of kindness every year, performing a variety of duties with one goal in mind – keeping our animals happy and healthy. Each and every one of ARL’s volunteers are dedicated, caring, and inspiring.

“I’m so lucky to have my job revolve around such amazing people,” said Debby Vogel, ARL’s Associate Director of Volunteer Services. “I’m so thankful for all those who donate their time and their hearts to ARL!”

To show our appreciation, this past week ARL held special volunteer events at its Boston, Dedham, and Brewster Animal Care and Adoption Centers.

boston volunteer group

Boston volunteer celebration.

A number of volunteers stood out this past year, earning special honors:

Best of Boston – Betsy Jones

Best of Boston – Liz Watson

Dedham’s Most Dignified – Desiree Artu

Cape’d Crusader – Lesley Roberts

Mobile’s Most Marvelous – Kim Cochrane

ARL’s Unsung Hero – Esther Mastrangelo

Admin’s Above and Beyond – Debbie Owen

Our Four Footed Friends Favorite Foster Parent – Molly Montgomery

Rookie’s Magic – Jamal Effee

Additionally, for the first time, ARL staff were also honored by volunteers:

Boston Volunteers Choice – Michelle Polin

Brewster Volunteers Choice – Dawn Lee Laub

Dedham Volunteers Choice – Alicia Muller

Get Involved

If you love animals and are looking to lend your hand and heart to helping animals in need, visit our volunteer page for more information and opportunities.

 

 

 

Two Cats Taking Advantage of Change to Quarantine Law

Meet Lars and Bryan Adams!

With strong support and encouragement from the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL), in October 2016 Governor Charlie Baker made significant changes to Massachusetts state regulations, which included reducing the rabies quarantine period for shelter animals from six to four months. In the years to come, this change will have a tremendous positive impact on shelters throughout the Commonwealth, and ARL has already seen the effect – Which brings us to Lars and Bryan Adams.

Besides off-the-charts cuteness factors, Lars and Bryan Adams have several other things in common. On the same day in early December 2016, Lars was brought as a stray from Jamaica Plain to ARL’s Boston shelter; Bryan Adams was found as a stray in Eastham and brought to ARL’s Brewster shelter.

Both cats were injured: For Lars it was a pair of ugly wounds on his left hip, while Bryan suffered from a swollen and infected right front paw – both injuries were consistent with altercations with another cat.

The cats immediately entered the four-month quarantine period, just in case either animal engaged with a cat that was rabid, and transmitted the virus to Lars or Bryan. The handsome boys were treated with antibiotics and pain medication, and their wounds quickly healed. Both were isolated and received regular veterinary check-ups to see if they had been infected.

Lars and Brian Adams

Lars (L) and Bryan Adams began their four-month quarantine period in December 2016. The average cost for a four-month quarantine is about $1,500.

Why the Regulation Changes Help Shelters AND Animals

The National Association of State Public Health Veterinarians issued new recommendations in the 2016 Compendium of Animal Rabies Prevention, advising the reduction of quarantine periods to four months. Why the reduction? Because evidence shows that animals in isolation for an extended period of six months can become stressed and depressed, even with regular human socialization.

Reducing the quarantine period also allow shelters like ARL to help more animals and ease financial constraints. From food, shelter to veterinary care, the average costs for a four-month quarantine are roughly $1,500, or $375 per month. The two-month reduction adds up to a $750 savings per animal.

“Overall the quarantine reduction does make a big difference,” said Dr. Erin Doyle, ARL’s Lead Veterinarian for Shelter Veterinary Services. “Four months is still well beyond our normal shelter length of stay so still requires extra measures such as office foster, but the two-month reduction does have a significant impact on how many rabies quarantine animals we’re able to care for.”

Ready to Go Home

Neither Lars or Bryan Adams have shown no evidence of a rabies infection, their wounds are healed, and with the quarantine period over, are ready to find their forever homes!

UPDATE: Certainly not a surprise, both Bryan and Lars were adopted quickly and are enjoying their new homes!

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Extended Care Needs Extra Support

When an animal is under a four-month quarantine, space is extremely limited, and special measures need to be taken. Along with regular checks by veterinary staff for signs of rabies, because the animal is in isolation, extra efforts need to be made by volunteers, staff and foster parents to spend time with the animal, keep them calm and give them love. While reduced quarantine periods save ARL shelters time and money, the costs for a four-month quarantine are still about $1,500 per animal, which is why we appreciate and continue to ask YOU for your support to allow us to help more animals in need.