Canines and Cocktails Says Farewell to Summer with Randy Price

Join ARL & Seaport Hotel for the Final Canines & Cocktails Event of Summer

The Seaport Hotel’s weekly Canines and Cocktails is finishing the season in style with a special event on September 3 benefiting the Animal Rescue League!

Special guest and Channel 5 Anchor, Randy Price will be on-site with his celebrity dog, Bruin.

Guests will have the chance to be part of the Channel 5’s special “Wake up Call” segment with their dog!  

Pups will receive organic, homemade dog treats by Seaport’s Executive Chef Richard Rayment and special “doggie bags” with treats to take home.

For their human companions,  this is a chance to relax and socialize over a cocktail (cash bar) with fellow doggie devotees.

Raffle prizes include an overnight stay at the Seaport Hotel, dinner for two at TAMO Bistro & Bar and a $100 gift certificate to Especially for Pets.

All money raised will benefit the Animal Rescue League of Boston and donations will be accepted on-site. 

R.S.V.P. on Eventbrite.

Dogs of all sizes are welcome and the event is weather dependent.

09-03-14 Canines & Cocktails Flyer Pic

 

Dangers of Leaving Your Dog in a Parked Car PSA [VIDEO]

ARL and Boston Fire Department team up for public service video

A few weeks ago, the ARL teamed up with our private veterinary clinic Boston Veterinary Care and the Boston Fire Department to create a public service video to warn pet owners of the dangers of leaving a dog in a parked car during the summer.

With temperatures approaching 90 degrees around Greater Boston, today seemed like the perfect day to re-share the video.

Watch it now:

Remember: dogs don’t sweat the way people do.

Even when it’s only 80 degrees outside, the inside of a car can heat up to more than 120 degrees in just minutes – even with the windows cracked.   When the temperature rises,  leave your dog at home.

Special thanks to the Boston Fire Department!

 

 

Video, Photos & Quotes From “Too Hot for Spot” Campaign

Leaving a pet in a parked car can have dangerous consequences!

To raise awareness for this important summer pet safety issue, the Animal Rescue League of Boston, the Boston Fire Department, and Boston Veterinary Care ask media to share important information about the dangers of leaving pets in parked cars during the summer. Even when temperatures dip below 80, the threat for potentially fatal heat stroke still exists.

The following video and photos are from the ARL’s “Dangers of leaving a dog in a hot car ” media avail. For more information, please contact Ami Bowen, Director of Marketing and Communications, at abowen@arlboston.org or (617) 226-5668.

Media are invited to download the video clips for use in summer pet safety stories.

Please credit the Animal Rescue League of Boston for all content.

Video Links and Photos

VIDEO: Animal Rescue League of Boston “Too Hot for Spot” hot car rescue video

VIDEO: Brian O’Connor, ARL Rescue Services Manager, on how quickly temperatures rise in a parked car

VIDEO: Dennis Keeley, Boston Fire Department District Chief, on how fire department rescues an animal from a parked car

VIDEO: Dr. Edward Schettino, Boston Veterinary Care, on how dangers of heatstroke in pets

PHOTO: Brian O’Connor, ARL Rescue Services Manager, explains the dangers of leaving a pet in a parked car on a hot day

PHOTO: The ARL has focused its summer campaign, “Too Hot for Spot” on raising awareness about the dangers of leaving a pet in a parked car

PHOTO: Dr. Edward Schettino, Boston Veterinary Care, explains that pets can easily suffer heatstroke when left in a parked car.

Additional Quotes

 Mary Nee, president of the Animal Rescue League of Boston:
“We live for the summers in New England. We want to be outside and do more things, and we want our dogs to be part of the fun.  We need to keep in mind what’s fun for us, might actually cause discomfort and injury to our much-loved pet.”

“Leaving your dog at home as you head out for summer activities and events is the best thing for you and your pet.  Prevention is responsible pet ownership.”

Dr. Rashel Shophet-Ratner, veterinarian at Boston Veterinary Care:
“On an 85 degree day, the temperature inside a parked car can top one hundred degrees in less than 10 minutes – even with all the windows cracked.  That’s why leaving a pet inside a parked car is the most common cause of potentially deadly heat stroke.”


Find More Information

Visit arlboston.org/summer-safety for tips about treating heatstroke, keeping your pet calm during a thunderstorm or safe during a house fire, and other advice from the ARL and BVC.

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Camping with Your Dog

Too Hot for Spot Tuesday: Tips for Safely Camping with Your Dog

Labor Day weekend is just around the corner! For those of us trying to squeeze in a last minute weekend trip before the dog days of summer slip away, it’s important to keep our pet’s safety in mind if we plan on bringing the pup along for the adventure.

Photo: Petswelcome.com

Photo: Petswelcome.com

Here are 6 tips that will help keep your dog safe during your next over-night camping trip :

  1. If your dog doesn’t regularly get flea/tick treatment, make sure you apply it at least a few days before the trip.
  2. Make sure that your pet has proper ID on his/her collar at all times and a reflective collar if he/she will be out on the campsite at night.
  3. Bring a pet first aid kit. It is always better to be prepared and often remote campsites will not have quick access to veterinary care. (We’ve been handing out pet emergency backpacks with pet first aid kits at our events)
  4. Do some research and locate the closest animal emergency clinic and add its contact information to your phone.
  5. Pet proof! Before you let your pet out on your campsite, thoroughly inspect the area to make sure other campers haven’t left anything behind like broken bottles or spoiled food.
  6. Don’t let your pet roam. Because your pet is not familiar with the area, he could get lost, fall into a river, or become stuck. Other well-meaning campers may feed him something toxic or may have rat poison out in their campsite. He also may have a run in with some not-so-well meaning wildlife.

For more summer safety tips visit: arlboston.org/summer-safety

 

ARL Supporter Glenn Mekelburg Passes Away

Glenn was an Animal Lover and Anna Harris Smith Legacy Supporter

Glenn Mekelburg with his cat

Glenn Mekelburg with his cat

We would like to take a moment to remember a dear ARL friend who passed away last week. Glenn Ross Mekelburg departed this Earth at the age of 65.  He was a passionate animal lover and will truly be missed by all of us here.

Caitlin Oates, manager of the ARL’s President’s Council, knew Glenn well and said “Glenn was an absolutely wonderful and kindhearted man. His love for animals was evident from the first moment I met him.  I am honored to have called him a friend.”

Glenn was a supporter of the Animal Rescue League and stated that “the ARL is unlike any other non-profit.”

Our thoughts are with Glenn and his family at this difficult time.

A memorial donation in his name may be made to the Animal Rescue League of Boston arlboston.org/donate. Arrangements are under the care of Young Funeral Home and Cremation Services Searsport, ME.

 

ARL Summer Social is Today!

Today: ARL Summer Social!

08--4-14 Summer Social_ThumbJoin the Animal Rescue League this evening for our Summer Social to celebrate our newly renovated K-9 play yard and reception area! The festivities start at 5:30PM and the first 100 people will receive a Boston Veterinary Care swag bag stuffed with special items for you and your pet.

Event Details
Tuesday, August 19
5:30PM – 7:30PM
10 Chandler Street, Boston, MA 02116

This is a free event! Bring your family and your pup. Please RSVP: arlsummersoc.eventbrite.com

Find more information about sponsors, food, and entertainment at http://bit.ly/arlsummersoc.

See you later!

Thank you to our sponsors for their contributions to our summer social event. Special thanks to Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams for generously furnishing our reception area.

08-15 Summer Social Sponsor graphics

 

 

Thanks to You, S2345 Passes in Massachusetts

S.2345 Passed Both Chambers! On its way to the Governor’s Desk!

Thanks to you, S.2345 passed the State House and Senate! The bill takes effect in 90 days once it’s signed into law by Governor Patrick.

08-14-14 Cute Dog PicS. 2345 (formerly called H.4328/ H.4244) increases maximum penalties for animal abuse from 5 years to 7 years in prison and $2,500 to $5,000 in fines.

In addition, the bill requires veterinarians to report suspected animal abuse. Also included in the new law is the creation of a task force comprised of experts in law enforcement, animal protection, veterinary medicine and the law to systematically and comprehensively evaluate the state’s cruelty statutes to ensure continued progress.

Learn more about S. 2345

“Today is a historic day for this legislative body, for the citizens of Massachusetts and—most especially—for animals,” said State Representative Lou Kafka, who was key in moving the bill through the House.

Phone calls to legislators from animal lovers across the state made the critical difference in creating a sense of urgency to getting the bill through.

“Thanks to the hard work of legislators and animal welfare supporters throughout Massachusetts, we will now have a law in place that strengthens our ability to prevent cruelty and will dramatically improve the welfare of animals in Massachusetts,” praised ARL president, Mary Nee.

Thank you to everyone who took action and gave a voice to the victims of animal cruelty!

Visit arlboston.org/take-action for more on S.2345 and what you can do to prevent animal cruelty.

 

S2345 Passes in Massachusetts

Animal Welfare Advocates Commend Lawmakers for New Measures, Stiffened Penalties for Animal Cruelty

BOSTON, MA – Animal protection groups including the Animal Rescue League of Boston (ARL) and MSPCA-Angell today lauded the passage of Senate Bill 2345 (formerly known as H4328/H4244) that establishes harsher punishments and financial penalties for animal cruelty and aims to prevent abuse from happening in Massachusetts.

The measures take effect in 90 days once S2345 is signed into law by Governor Patrick.

07-28 S2345-thumb

The ARL credits citizen animal advocates who called legislators in the final weeks of the 2014 session to urge passage of S2345 (formerly known as H4328/H4244).

The bill raises maximum penalties for animal cruelty convictions from five to seven years and increases the maximum fine from $2,500 to $5,000. S2345 also allows a penalty of up to 10 years and/or a fine of $10,000 for repeat convictions. In addition, the bill requires veterinarians to report suspected animal abuse. Also included in the new law is the creation of a task force comprised of experts in law enforcement, animal protection, veterinary medicine and the law to systematically and comprehensively evaluate the state’s cruelty statutes to ensure continued progress.

“Today is a historic day for this legislative body, for the citizens of Massachusetts and—most especially—for animals,” said State Representative Lou Kafka, who was key in moving the bill through the House. “This law is an urgently needed update to outdated penalties and ensures that legislators continually receive the best advice on how to combat animal cruelty in our Commonwealth, directly from the experts who deal with it most frequently.”

“Thanks to the hard work of legislators and animal welfare supporters throughout Massachusetts, we will now have a law in place that strengthens our ability to prevent cruelty and will dramatically improve the welfare of animals in Massachusetts,” praised Mary Nee, president of the ARL.

Prior to the passage of S2345, Massachusetts maintained some of the most lenient fines in the nation for animal abuse, with a maximum of $2,500. Many other states have higher prison sentences as well.  The new law marks the first update of these penalties in nearly ten years and reflects broad public consensus that animal cruelty must never be tolerated.

Representative Bruce Ayers stated, “The passage of the bill is evidence that lawmakers are listening to their constituents, who—especially in the wake of the horrific Puppy Doe animal abuse case in Quincy, my district, last year —are demanding stricter penalties for those who abuse or kill animals. As the sponsor of this animal welfare bill, I am pleased with this outcome.”

Kara Holmquist, director of advocacy for the MSPCA-Angell states, “We’re very pleased that this crucial legislation has passed, and we extend our thanks to all of the bill’s sponsors and supporters who championed these reforms. We also thank every caring citizen who contacted state legislators to urge for stronger laws to both punish animal abusers and, importantly, work to prevent cruelty from happening the first place. Animal lovers around the state can today celebrate these efforts and hopefully can find some peace knowing that from such tragic incidents, like Puppy Doe and others, awareness has been generated that will now prevent harm to other helpless animals.”

“Abusive acts toward animals are unacceptable, and all too often can lead to violence toward people. Our laws need to strongly and clearly penalize those who commit the kinds of brutal acts we’ve seen in the Puppy Doe case and others, and this legislation makes major progress in achieving that goal,” said Senator Bruce Tarr. “It couldn’t have been accomplished without organizations like the MSPCA and ARL the thousands of individuals who have driven this effort from the drafting of the bill to its arrival on the Governor’s desk.”

About the Animal Rescue League of Boston
Founded in 1899, the ARL is dedicated to rescuing domesticated animals and wildlife from suffering, cruelty, abandonment, and neglect. In 2013, the ARL served over 14,000 individual animals through our shelters in Boston, Brewster, and Dedham, and our law enforcement, rescue, and veterinary services. The ARL receives no government funding and relies solely on the generosity of supporters to help animals in need. Visit arlboston.org for more information.

About the MSPCA-Angell
The MSPCA-Angell is a national and international leader in animal protection and veterinary medicine and provides direct hands-on care for thousands of animals each year. Founded in 1868, it is the second-oldest humane society in the United States. Services include animal protection and adoption, advocacy, humane education, law enforcement, and world-class veterinary care. The MSPCA-Angell is a private, non-profit organization. It does not receive any government funding nor is it funded or operated by any national humane organization.

 

 

2.5 Years and Still Waiting…

Pringle, Tater Tot and Porkchop Have Been Waiting Long Enough. Help Them Find Love!

“These three dogs are all very sweet and thoroughly enjoy the company of people – but who can blame them after having to spend 2.5 years in a kennel waiting for their chance at a home!  It’s time to give them a loving family that they deserve!” – Marianne Gasbarro, ARL’s Boston Shelter Manager

If you’ve been following the story behind the crisis at Boston Animal Control’s Roslindale facility, then you’ve surely heard of Camilla, the dog brought our attention to the situation. Thankfully, Camilla was adopted and is finally experiencing what it means to have a loving home. However, Camilla is only one of four dogs who spent two and a half years at the BAC’s Roslindale pound and those dogs are patiently waiting for their chance to go home.

08-13-14 BAC PringlePringle, Tater Tot and Porkchop came to the Animal Rescue League with Camilla on July 2 from Boston Animal Control. It’s clear that all of them crave human attention and love. There’s no reason for these dogs to be in shelters any longer. They deserve a true home.

Pringle is an adorable 4-year-old pup. She’s small and sweet and will love to sit on your lap. She’s done a couple sleepovers with a volunteer and did well crated for the car ride and for little bits of time when the volunteer left her. She loves to cuddle in bed and will wake you up with kisses and a thumping tail. Pringle loves meeting new human friends. Meet her at our Boston shelter!

Check out Pringle’s video below.

08-08-14 BAC PorkchopPorkchop is an easy going gal who just wants to be by your side! She can occaisonally be shy at first when meeting new people, but often times warms up right away. She’s very playful and will literally do anything you ask as long as it means she can spend time with you! She can be a bit pushy with other dogs, and will likely do best as the only dog in the house or potentially could do well with a compatible male dog.  Meet her at our Brewster shelter on Cape Cod.

08-14-14 BAC Tater TotTater Tot is 8-years-old and is hoping to spend her golden years with you. She is a sweet, easy going girl who loves to go for city walks and will want to say hello to every person she passes. Tater Tot loves people but would do best as an only dog. Being an older girl she does not like it when other dogs jump at her. Come in to our Boston shelter and meet this super cute girl today!

Isn’t two and a half years long enough to be homeless? Please help Pringle, Tater Tot and Porkchop find homes. Share their story with your friends and family.

 

 

Too Hot to Trot

Too Hot for Spot Tuesday: Tips for Safely Running with your Dog in the Summer

Exercising with your dog can be fun, but it’s important to adjust your running schedule in the summer to accommodate your pup. Running in the summer heat with your dog can be dangerous. We humans sweat in the summer, while our dog only has the ability to cool down with the pads of his feet and through panting. Your canine runner may be in excellent condition but over-heating and heatstroke can be fatal for even the most fit canines.

Here are some tips to help keep your pup safe while you train:

  • toohotforspot_summerexerciseAdjust your running schedule to the early morning or late evening to avoid the hottest parts of the day.
  • Check the weather: It’s no fun to exercise on a 95 degree day with 80 percent humidity — for either one of you. Check the weather the night before and be flexible with your workout time, choosing cooler times of the day to get your run in. Your dog may be really sad and whine when you shut the door, but if it’s way too hot, it’s best to leave him at home where it’s cool.
  • Know your breed’s special health concerns: Short-muzzled breeds, like boxers can overheat quickly.
  • Watch for signs of dehydration: Bring along a water bottle and a collapsible bowl, periodically giving your dog water breaks
  • Consider the surface: Asphalt and concrete can be too hot for furry feet, and rocks and gravel may cause cuts, so stick to dirt roads or sandy trails. After the run, check your dog’s pads for cracking or other injuries.

Remember, your dog can’t tell you when he’s tired, or thirsty. Keep a watchful eye on your dog, and notice whether he’s struggling to keep up, panting excessively, or limping. Take breaks throughout your workout to give him a chance to catch his breath, rest his muscles, and grab a few laps of water.

For more summer pet safety tips visit arlboston.org/summer-safety